Functional Order: Si-Te-Fi-Ne

Bagheera bases his interactions with Mowgli and Sher Khan on former knowledge of them both – his distrust of the tiger stems from what he knows of Sher’s past; his guidance of Mowgli originates in his role in the boy’s life (“I know [he’s special]; I raised him.” Bagheera respects the “jungle law” and tries to convince Mowgli at first to adhere to it, to become more like an animal than a man. But once he sees how Mowgli’s innovations are useful, Bagheera changes his mind, encouraging the boy to use his skills for the betterment of the jungle animals. His uncertainty about how things may play out in the future makes Bagheera careful, practical, and dutiful… but against all odds, for whatever reason, when finding Mowgli as a child in the jungle, Bagheera defied animal convention and took care of him, leaving him with the wolf pack to protect him. He gradually opens up to new ways of doing things, once he sees how Mowgli can save lives through his inventions. Many of his decisions are rationally-motivated, rather than being born of sentiment; Bagheera is not afraid to do what is hard, to do what is right, particularly when it will save Mowgli’s life. His commands are not suggestions; they are orders. Following them keeps Mowgli alive. Bagheera is appreciative of the ways of the jungle, and respects their laws. He is willing to live by them, and enforce them when necessary. He puts aside emotions to keep others safe (not wanting to tell Mowgli the truth about what Shere Khan is doing to the wolf pack, knowing Mowgli will return and be killed). Though not forthcoming about his feelings, Bagheera loves Mowgli; he risks his own life multiple times to save the “man-cub.” He comes to respect Mowgli’s individuality and, once convinced it is not harmful, encourages him to be unique and pursue his creative talents. Bagheera initially shows some prejudice toward the bear, but does come to a point where he can offer affirmation and encouragement to his friend – which forms into grudging compatibility.

Enneagram: 1w2 sp/so

Bagheera is confident in his conclusions and in training up young Mowgli to do what is right, responsible, and self-sacrificing. He holds himself to a high standard of behavior and looks down on others who use Mowgli to their own ends (initially, he dislikes Baloo because he scorns him as a bear who “never works” only to earn respect for him when the bear goes out of his way to prove his loyalty and friendship to the “man-cub”). Bagheera acts primarily out of duty and tries to teach Mowgli the same. His 2 wing shows in his willingness to create conflict for the greater good of Mowgli, and his assertive opinions. He is dedicated to Mowgli and the wolves, and willingn to serve them for the common good.