Functional Order: Si-Te-Fi-Ne

Frank made his career out of catching bad guys for the Texas Rangers, and when he’s put on the case to find Bonnie and Clyde, he goes about it in a much different manner from all the younger men foundering around, playing catch up to the bank robbers. Frank gathers as much information and as many details as he can find on the duo, studies it in depth, and recognizes a pattern in their behavior, that they follow along the same basic route. He applies a principle learned through decades of law enforcement – “no matter who they are, they always go home to their family.” And he’s right. His inferior Ne doesn’t waste much time on speculating on motives. He just uses what he knows to build a pattern of behavior and follows it, until he gets them in his crosshairs. He is a man of logic in all his decisions, often who covers up his feelings beneath rationalities. The reason he did not want to recruit his old partner, he claims, is “I saw you walking like a seventy year old.” (The real reason later comes out – “I didn’t want to bring you to this moment [of having to kill these two young people in cold blood]”). Frank rationally figures out a plan of action. He collects facts and evidence, he buys the weapons he needs, he reaches out to the authorities required for appropriate action. His partner tells a story of their younger years, when Frank realized going “by the book” was getting good men killed, so he told them to do the logical but unethical thing for the greater good – not to warn a group of banditos before they started shooting. His emotions are hidden deep inside, and hardly ever come to the surface. Frank doesn’t need anyone else’s approval. He doesn’t talk about their cases much. He shows a little tenderness, after months of ribbing, to his partner, and admits that he’s “better with people.”

Enneagram: 8w9 sp/so

His wife’s friends call him “unreachable” and tough. Frank just doesn’t bother to be sociable with any of them. His tactics when getting information tend toward rebelliousness (defying the authorities), head-on aggression (beating up a gas attendant after being offended by his support of Bonnie and Clyde), and detachment (he reminds his partner and a young cop, repeatedly, that the people they are hunting “aren’t human anymore… they have shot cops in the face, in cold blood; she turned him over, so he could see what was coming”). He had a reputation in his younger years for flouting the rules and being brutal in his effectiveness. Frank is tough, no-nonsense, and willing to do what needs done, no matter what approach is required. His 9 wing has a laid back approach to most things, and remains almost supernaturally calm except when he loses his cool and snaps.