Mary Shelley: Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin [INFP 4w5]

Functional Order: Fi-Ne-Si-Te

Judging Functional Axis:

Introverted Feeling (Fi) / Extroverted Thinking (Te)

Mary believes everyone “should have a right to live as they choose, but my truth is that there will never be anyone for me but” Percy Shelley. She thwarts society and does not mind a scandal provided it enables her happiness in her current relationship with Percy. Mary also refuses to budge from her convictions when both Percy and his friends urge her to be unfaithful to him. She does not push her values on anyone else, but also will not compromise on anything she believes is right. Mary deeply internalizes her emotions and pain after the loss of her child, refusing to speak about her loss except on her terms but also developing them into Frankenstein. She frets that she is not making progress in her life, and not moving forward, but does not actively pursue it; she can be hard-nosed and argumentative under stress (inferior Te).

Perceiving Functional Axis:

Extroverted Intuition (Ne) / Introverted Sensing (Si)

She dwells in an imagination full of ideas, but also “borrows” heavily from other stories – her father tells her to stop copying other people’s words and find her own. She has a liberal, rather unorthodox view of relationships and responsibilities for Regency England, and stands upon them. Once challenged to write a ghost story, she takes her personal experiences and those of her sister, and transforms them into a poetic, melancholy tale of an abandoned creature without love. Mary borrows heavily from her own experiences and impressions of people (Si) in the process. She spends some time in depression, and in a Si loop, after the loss of her child – with no Ne creativity or hope for the future.

Enneagram: 4w5 self-preservation

Mary is a melancholy and withdrawn soul, taking pride in how different she is from others with their common morals, and in spending time at her mother’s grave; she channels all of her feelings of loneliness, rejection, and abandonment into the Creature in Frankenstein, which represents herself, her sister, and others “taken in and used up” by the likes of Percy Shelley and Lord Byron. Her 5 makes her withdrawn, self-reflecting, and self-sufficient. She does not need or want anyone’s approval (so-blind). She’s assertive and competitive, focused on her intense emotional relationships.