Function Order: Fi-Ne-Si-Te

“I would rather share one lifetime with you than face all the ages of this world alone.”

Arwen

Even though she wants to keep her father happy, Arwen also feels a need to be true to herself and pursue Aragorn at the cost of her own life. She makes choices for herself, based on what she wants and values, and attempts to persuade anyone who tries to make her feel any different into being supportive of her need to follow her heart. Though she reluctantly submits to her father’s wishes for her to leave Middle-Earth, Arwen rushes back to him after seeing a vision of what she is leaving behind to confront him. She disagrees with him that “some things are certain,” by arguing there is always an alternate point of view, and a better reality to pursue. She encourages her father to have faith in Aragorn despite his avoidance of his responsibilities thus far. She has an unshaken idealism that governs her romantic attachment to him—when Aragorn fears his bad blood may condemn him to the same flaws as his ancestors, Arwen tells him that “you will face the same evil and defeat it.” She believes he will become the King of Gondor, and stakes her life on it. Since she bears no Ring of Power, the more Sauron grows in power, the more she “fades away” and the more essential it becomes for Aragorn to defeat him. Everything Arwen predicts and shapes her life toward come true.

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Arwen’s entire drive seems to be love—finding it, holding onto it, and being willing to walk away from her Elfin heritage to endure happiness however long it lasts on earth. She gives of herself endlessly to Aragorn, granting him the Evenstar for protection even though she knows she will fade away without it, and in so doing, helps him become the man he his “born to be.” She shows the same open willingness to self-sacrifice when she saves Frodo by asking for what grace she receives to fall upon him in the same way. She surrenders to her father’s will at times out of a desire to please him, but her love for a mortal cannot be denied. She surrenders out of a sense of duty, obedience, and devotion, because it is the right thing to do, but she can also be feisty and confrontational. Arwen accuses her father of keeping the truth from her (“I saw a child!”), and stands up to the Ringwraiths to protect Frodo (moving into 8 aggression tactics by challenging them to “come and claim him” if they dare). She zeroes in all her attention on Aragorn, into pursuing and enriching their bond through her selflessness.