Harry Potter: Lily Evans Potter [ENFJ 1w2]

Functional Order: Fe-Ni-Se-Ti

Judging Functional Axis:

Extroverted Feeling (Fe) / Introverted Thinking (Ti)

Lily forms quick judgments about people based on their behavior toward other people – at first, she felt a lot of contempt for James because of his bullying of other kids, especially her friend Snape. But she also admired his own willingness to stand up for what he thought he was right, which allowed her later to give him a second chance—once she saw that he had matured and become more responsible. She gives endless chances to her friend Snape to change, and only backs away from him and is “done for good” when she sees how far he is sinking into the Dark Arts, something that hurts others and that she cannot tolerate. Confronted by the Dark Lord, she refuses to move and offers to die in his place—ultimately doing so, and casting the protection of love upon her son that temporarily destroys Voldemort.

Perceiving Functional Axis:

Introverted Intuition (Ni) / Extroverted Sensing (Se)

One professor called her a “singularly gifted witch,” capable of the most beautiful magic he had ever seen – such as the lily petal that transformed itself into a goldfish to represent her, in his mind. Lupin says that she had an extraordinary ability to see the good in other people, even if they could not see it in themselves – and that he benefited from her kindness in this manner. She foresaw Snape’s turn to darkness and refused to have anything to do with it, but also could see the good in James once he ceased his destructive behaviors and matured. She was often quick to act on others’ behalf, and fearless; Dumbledore commented that, much like Harry, she was “strong.”

Enneagram: 1w2 social

Lily has strong moral principles and isn’t afraid to stand up to anyone, about anything – she berates James and Sirius in public for their treatment of other students and tells them off for being mean; she tells off Snape for trying to indoctrinate her against James (“I don’t need you to tell me about him, I know…”), and then turns against him when she cannot agree with his interest in Voldemort or the Death Eaters. But she can also be tolerant, forgiving, and kind – willing to give James and his friends a second chance, to help Lupin connect to his deeper sense of inner worth and goodness, and even presumably to be kind to Peter.