Functional Order: Fe-Si-Ne-Ti

Judging Functional Axis:

Extroverted Feeling (Fe) / Introverted Thinking (Ti)

Ada is highly forthcoming with her feelings and wants “no secrets between us.” She constantly asserts how she feels about things—from Esther’s engagement to Mr. Jarndyce (she disapproves) to how she feels about Richard neglecting his health and spending all his time at chancery court. She does not like it when Esther does not confide in her and “punishes” her by keeping secrets of her own. Her emotions lead most of her decisions, as she marries a boy without means or prospects, no stable source of income, and no ability to work to provide for her or their children, simply because she loves him. She fails to analyze her own decisions and feelings, to look at things in a detached manner, or to understand Esther’s decision as regards her intended marriage.

Perceiving Functional Axis:

Introverted Sensing (Si) / Extroverted Intuition (Ne)

She is a sensible girl who wants a normal life, who is quite loyal to the young man she has just met, and intends to be a proper wife and mother to their children. She, unlike Richard, does not put all her hopes in their future prospects and urges him to live more in the present, but also learn from Mr. Jarndyce, whose experiences at court have taught him that the ongoing case brings more misery than joys over time. She has an idealistic streak with her lower Ne, but is not good at reading between the lines or making accurate guesses about what others are keeping from her, though she does have a firm dislike for Mr. Skimpole and his skeevy lawyer friend.

Enneagram: 2w1 sexual

Ada wants love above all—so much so, she is willing to burn her bridges with Mr. Jarndyce and live in poverty to be with Richard. She lets her emotions lead her decisions and finds any other way of being heartless and unfathomable. Not only is she interested in her own love life, and eager to form a strong, intimate bond with Esther, she is also curious about and even a little meddlesome in Esther’s love life, pushing her toward Mr. Woodcourt repeatedly. Things easily touch her—she cries over other people’s hardships and struggles. Though distressed when Richard is sullen and rude at dinner, she also stands up for and defends him whenever Jarndyce complains that Richard is making the wrong decision, showing her loyal and supportive nature. Ada also wishes to do what is right and can be quite firm and reactive at times, responding to things on an instinctual level.