Function Order: Fe-Si-Ne-Ti

It’s unfathomable to Andy that anyone would put “the rules” above the common welfare of a single soul. He shows this expressly in the episode where the new female druggist comes to town. A by the book girl, she refuses to give pills out to a local hypochondriac without a prescription. The woman plays up her emotions and ailments until the entire town is on her side, Andy included—which makes him have a bad attitude toward the pretty new druggist, because she’s putting the rules of her profession above humanity. He instantly judges her for being mean and shakes his head over her, but the minute she brings around the bottle of pills (and he finds out they’re just sugar pills), his attitude toward her changes and he once more likes her. Andy has a warm and accommodating presence, but also can be forceful in getting his own way – when he wants a friend to get his shot at becoming a big-time musician, he cites a music agent’s car and keeps him in jail overnight just so he’s forced to hear the music and give his friend a shot. Somewhat traditional in his contentment in his job full of same-ness (minor disputes and infractions), Andy is also prone to lower Ne flits of fantasy—after he asks a girl out, he is pleased as punch about it, but in talking through it around Aunt Bea, he starts questioning her motives and reaching the wrong conclusions (due to weak lower Ti). He concludes that she is husband hunting and using being nice to Opie to go after him, causing a huge misunderstanding, hurt feelings, and public embarrassment when his conclusions all turn out to be wrong.

Enneagram: 9w8 so/sp

Andy is incredibly permissive and good-natured; he willingly puts aside the rules on a regular basis in favor of both ‘folks’ and doing whatever he wants (including breaking in to the local drugstore using the key before anyone comes to unlock the doors, because Aunt Bea needs to buy some things). He has a laid-back attitude and isn’t flustered by most things, remaining cool and unflappable even when Barney is full of hysterics. He doesn’t like a fuss, however, and will smooth things over and pretend that nothing is wrong, occasionally finding it hard to apologize in the process. He has no real moral compass and just does whatever he wants to get leverage in a situation whenever anyone annoys him, in order to maintain control. But most of the time he is pleasant and lives in denial of any wrongdoing, either on other people’s part or his own. He can also be naïve and easily believe people are good.