Function Order: Te-Si-Ne-Fi

Strickland prides himself on being efficient and getting things done—he captured the creature, he intends to subdue it, and if that doesn’t work, he advocates for cutting it open to see how its internal organs work, in order to gain medical and scientific knowledge that they could use at a later date. He becomes angry whenever anything thwarts his plans and makes him look a fool in the presence of his superiors, such as when an overly responsible underling reports the creature’s disappearance to the general without allowing Strickland time to make active progress in tracking it down and returning it to its cage. It doesn’t occur to him to bond with the creature or appeal to it on an emotional level, so he uses force and intimidation instead. Though he does trust his insights and shows them on occasion, he also displays a tendency to think too much in the present. He has the two women responsible for the creature’s abduction brought to his office so he can question them, and doesn’t suspect them of anything. He fails to comprehend who kidnapped the amphibian man, until the “Russian spy” clues him into the fact that it was a pair of cleaning ladies. Then he’s able to piece together one of the women responsible, but he still doesn’t guess the main participant was Elisa. He has other strange little preferential quirks, such as remarking that he has only ever liked one kind of candy—it’s cheap, but “the only one for me,” which stems from his childhood adoration for it.

Enneagram: 6w5 so/sp

Though a cruel and unhealthy man who tries to come off as an 8, Strickland seems to be reliant on desiring to please his superiors; when speaking of disloyalty toward him, he says, “A man is faithful, loyal and efficient all his life, and he is useful. And he has certain expectations in return. And then he fails once. Only once. Does that make him a failure?” He comes apart completely and denigrates into violence and sadism when he realizes he has put all his faith and hard work into a system that doesn’t value him and considers him expendable. He wants to make himself useful to his superiors so they won’t abandon him. His counter-phobic 6 behaviors are extreme–he resorts to unnecessary violence against the creature and gets his own fingers bit off. Rather than thank Elisa for finding his fingers so the hospital could sew them back on, he complains that she put them in a sandwich bag and got “mustard on them.” When they putrefy and turn black, just to scare Zelda, he finally rips them off his own hand, in a gush of blood, to make a point. He sticks his fingers in a man’s bullet wound and drags him out into the rain to intimidate him, then winds up shooting the creature and Elisa in retaliation for them humiliating him by escaping. He shows his wife very little concern, in that he covers her mouth during sex and demands she be quiet. He also makes inappropriate sexual overtures to Elisa at work, intimating that he’d like to make her ‘squeal,’ since it ‘turns me on.’