Function Order: Si-Fe-Ti-Ne

Nick’s entire life revolves around his vineyard. He’s done it for years, he knows everything there is to know about the various wines, he can identify them by taste, and he admits to his ex-wife that he has a ‘limited’ amount of interests. In short, wine. He has a cellar full of bottles he has purchased, and he’s placed specific emphasis on the one produced the year he met and married Lizzie and they had their twins. He’s hung onto it for over a decade, and wears he would ‘drink it with no one’ but her. Once she reenters his life, it takes him no time at all to fall back into his old habit of loving her, and to wonder what broke them up in the first place. He starts automatically shifting his affections to her, rather than his current fiancée, Meredith, whom he comes to realize is shallow and scheming. Given the choice between his new marriage and keeping his daughters, as a family-oriented man, Nick naturally chooses his girls. He asks them to be appropriate and kind to Meredith, he expects them to behave themselves in public, he punishes them for wrongful behavior, and he is quite easy and friendly and open with his feelings. He wants to make sure that Hallie feels all right with his decision to marry Meredith, so he asks her for her opinion. He has an inkling ‘something is different’ about Hallie, but isn’t sure what.

Enneagram: 9w1 sp/so

Let’s face it. Nick is… passive. He lets Meredith walk all over him, make all the decisions in their relationship (where they are getting married, what the ceremony will be like, the guest list), and only at the end finds a way to passive-aggressively stand up to her, when she demands he choose between her or the twins. He seems unruffled that she “threw my engagement ring at my head” and happily goes home to make eyes at his ex-wife. He doesn’t want to force a conversation on Hallie that she doesn’t want to have, so he beats around the bush about telling her about her future stepmother. When Lizzie left him, rather than chasing her to London, he just let her leave… and later, wonders why. Though he asks the girls to behave themselves, he doesn’t actively stop them from their pranks, suspect they are up to anything, or take extreme measures to punish them (they’re just grounded).