Functional Order: Te-Si-Ne-Fi

Unlike his wife, Norman judges things based on what he sees and hears, and the evidence that either supports or denies her claims—he doesn’t believe the neighbor has killed his wife, since he did not see any of the suspicious activities she did, and he thinks her ideas about ghosts are ludicrous. Claire hides her séance from him, knowing he will not approve of such an irrational method as attempting to communicate with ghosts. Spoilers. It turns out that Norman killed the woman who haunts their house, because she threatened to expose their affair to the dean, which would have ruined his career and gotten him blacklisted as a teacher. So he arranged for her disappearance to look like her decision, drowned her, and put her body in the lake, where it has remain “lost.” Norman tries to do the same to Claire—he does not want her to expose him for the murder, so he misleads her into believing he has called the police to confess to him finding the dead girl in their home and covering up her suicide, then drugs her and tries to drown her in the bathtub. He says that everyone will believe her suicide, because they all knew Claire was on the verge of an emotional breakdown, after their daughter went to college. A somewhat suspicious man, Norman at first thought Claire was attempting to manipulate him and knew something about the affair, but soon realized she was on the wrong track and innocent of what happened. He is a scientist who feels insecure about not having any discoveries to his name—unlike his father. Norman returned after his death to take over his scientific center and now runs it, often spending more time at the office than home with his wife. Norman is somewhat oblivious to Claire’s possession until he sees his dead girlfriend looking out through her eyes; he just wonders what is ‘up’ with his wife, who is acting more sexually provocative than usual. He’s somewhat oblivious to her feelings, but at first seems tender—he doesn’t want her to feel upset after their daughter leaves and worries about her fragile mental state. He says that the fights of their neighbors are none of their business.

Enneagram: 3w4 sp/so

Claire says of her husband that he is ‘too insecure’ about being compared to his father and laughed at for not being nearly as brilliant; to make up for it, Norman is a workaholic who spends more time at the office than at home. He attacked his girlfriend because she threatened to ruin his reputation and expose him as a professor willing to sleep with his college students. Norman doesn’t allow his feelings (or any personal ethics) to stop him from protecting his reputation, even when it requires him killing his wife in the process. He can be somewhat aloof, unconcerned, and detached in his personal life. He’s also insecure about his own accomplishments, inclined to compare himself negatively to his father, and somewhat self-centered in his occasional moody behaviors.