Function Order: Fe-Si-Fe-Ti

Jacob is warm, friendly, and good-natured. He tries to strike up a conversation with Newt right away and offers him good luck, even though he thinks Newt has come to the bank to get the same kind of loan that he is (“Why are you her?” “Same thing as you.” “You want to open up a bakery too??”) Jacob loves it that Queenie can read his mind, and doesn’t mind saying so. He goes on to praise her cooking, tell her how much he enjoys being around her, and that he doesn’t want to lose his memories. Jacob clearly draws comfort from others thinking well of him – when Newt finally admits how much he enjoys spending time with him, Jacob is at peace with his decision. Jacob pushes Newt to be more appropriate in company, by insisting it would be rude to decline an offer of dinner after all the trouble their beautiful hostess’ went to, and also tells Newt not to compare Tina’s eyes to those of a salamander in front of her, because that would insult her. Jacob is somewhat naïve in how the world works, in that he assumes if he shows up at the bank and impresses the banker with his delicious pastries, the bank will give him a loan to build his bakery… without thinking that he needs collateral. When the bank pushes him for it, Jacob tries to draw attention to his goods again instead. He has honed his baking skills over years of practice, with the intention of becoming a successful businessman. His pastries are from “Grandma’s recipe,” and he feels quite proud of them. He’s also far more aware of the social consequences of their actions than Queenie, because he knows how the world works – if anyone finds out he knows the truth, he’ll be mind-wiped and she’ll wind up in jail. He doesn’t want that to happen to her, so he refuses to marry her by going against the law to do it. His advice is often rational and sensible, though sometimes tinged with emotion (he doesn’t want Queenie to leave him, because she might get hurt; and they can’t marry if it’s against the law without facing real repercussions). Until he meets Newt, he has an expectation of how the world works… but once introduced to this fantastical new way of viewing life, Jacob is eager to experience everything. He goes on to run his bakery, many of his ideas influenced by subconscious, buried sensory impressions of the creatures that made the biggest impression on him. In a self-deprecating remark, Jacob admits he knows the magical world is real, because he isn’t talented enough to dream up all of this stuff on its own. He takes vague impressions rooted in his subconscious and turns them into creative pastries; his shop has many different kinds of breads to sell. He is able to accept that magic exists without much effort, even though it challenges his ideas of reality.

Enneagram: 6w7 sp/so

Jacob is good-natured and a lot of fun to be around, but also a bit anxious and fearful of the unknown. He doesn’t like to take chances and is immediately skeptical of Grindelwald; despite seeing a vision of another war and the devastation humans will wreak on each other, he is skeptical of Grindelwald’s intentions and knows they cannot trust him — so he refuses to go with Queenie into his clutches, even though it’s what she wants and she assures him they can be together. Jacob opens up enormously into his 7 wing around Newt – he becomes enthralled with the fantastical, wonderful creatures around him and the worlds that exist outside normal perceptions, he eagerly takes part in adventures (but doesn’t want Queenie to fight, in case she gets hurt), and has an optimistic, cheerful attitude that things will turn out all right. Even when he has his mind wiped, he volunteers to do it, because it seems like the sensible, proper thing to do and he had fun while it lasted.