Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Dumbledore says the reason he likes Newt so much is because Newt decides what the best thing to do is and does it, regardless of how others feel about it; he always takes the moral high road and fights for others to have the right to survive and thrive, despite the bad things they’ve done. He refuses to kill Credence even though he has caused mass destruction and is “dangerous” because he finds him remarkable, and likens him to one of his magical creatures – misunderstood and worthy of being saved. Newt is an emotionally intense person who invests much of his love and attention into harmless creatures. He considers himself their protector and is willing to break international wizarding law to protect, capture, and set them free, since he believes it’s the right thing to do. Newt finds it difficult to express his true feelings – after falling in love with Tina, he doesn’t come right out and tell her, but instead asks if she’d like his book and if he should deliver it in person. When Jacob asks, at long last, why Newt “kept him around” for so long, Newt confesses “I like you.” He doesn’t volunteer it, but him showing Jacob the world inside his briefcase, including him in all his adventures, and financially supporting his endeavors after the mind-wipe, indicates his affection for his friend. Newt isn’t in tune with other people’s feelings—he has no clue why Tina is no longer speaking to him, and doesn’t notice that Bunty is also in love with him; to him, she’s just an assistant. Newt is quite opportunistic and confident in adapting to a new situation and acting in his environment, even if it’s not always safe – he adopts his brother’s face to walk into the Ministry, then meets him there, and shrugs out of his disguise and starts running. He’s highly aware of what’s going on around him, and at times destructive – his attempts to catch the niffler leave a jewelry store in total chaos. He physically interacts with all of his magical creatures, even the dangerous ones – throwing himself in front of a rampaging creature, using a kitty toy to lure another into a suitcase, diving into a pool even though the creature it contains is dangerous and has bit his assistant, and thinking about how to use the Thunderbird to mind-wipe the entire city at once. Newt isn’t double-minded about anything; he knows what he thinks and believes and acts decisively on it, including challenging Grindelwald and trying to keep his loved ones safe. He never wavers from his belief that Credence can be saved, and his firm conviction that he’s the one to do it. Nor does he listen to Grindelwald’s lies or get caught up in them, because he sees them as unrealistic. Newt believes in each person’s inner goodness. He communicates on an internal level with his creatures. His single objective is to learn as much as he can about them, in order to write a book (which he will!). His intense ability to understand another’s pain helps him reach out to him, in an attempt to pull him back from darkness. Newt has an overall positive belief things will work out fine in the end. Facts are easy for him to cough up, and his answers are always rational – why should Jacob wear this helmet? Because his skull might crush if hit at high velocity. Newt intends to write a factual volume on how to care for and identify magical creatures. He’s good at coming up with a plan when he needs to, but prefers to act in the moment.

Enneagram: 9w1 so/sx

Newt says there’s no point in worrying about anything, since that’s useless; he handles everything calmly and with a sense of confidence. Despite his magical creatures giving him all kinds of hellish inconveniences, he never loses his temper with any of them—coaxing them, appealing to them, and going along with them passively to get them to obey him or shrink to fit inside his suitcase (or a teacup). Newt doesn’t like conflict and tries to avoid his brother, because his brother is forever ‘on’ at him about something. He also says he never chooses sides, because he can see all of them (until he encounters Grindelwald, and then “I’ve chosen a side” – to be with his brother). He doesn’t quite know what to do when people are upset, and stands around looking awkward, and trying not to draw attention to himself. But he also has firm views about right and wrong, and wants to be a good person – even though he doesn’t think his travel ban is fair, he tries to abide by the law and go through the proper channels to get it reinstated (and then only leaves the country at the request of Dumbledore, to save Credence).