Function Order: Te-Si-Ne-Fi

One of Carol’s first sentences is to get annoyed with Hal for over-sleeping. She says she used to do that too… and then she turned eleven, implying that his behavior is immature and irresponsible. She brings this up again later when pointing out that his reaction is “childish, that’s what children do” – aka, adults don’t leave things half finished, squander all their time, and ignore the good opportunities others have given them. She doesn’t. She works hard as a businesswoman and a pilot, grounds him for destroying a plane (rather than firing him, because even if he’s a jerk, he’s still one of their most valuable assets). She tells him that he has cost them thousands of dollars, but then later thanks him for giving her the opportunity to negotiate better terms with her buyers and for their tech department to improve their planes. She’s a mean negotiator, and a strong-willed woman, frank with her opinions and responsible in her actions. Much of her judgments come from her own subjective experiences and having watched Hal “self-destruct” over the years. She reminiscences with him and recalls details that he ignores (“it was my birthday”). She also instantly knows it’s him, despite his green uniform and mask (“I’ve known you all my life and seen you naked; do you really think I wouldn’t recognize you, even without those cheekbones?”). Carol believes he should use his powers for good, and urges him to be more responsible, to grow up, and stop running away from everything. She can’t understand why he does that and asks him to explain himself. She also asks a ton of questions to learn more details about the suit—how he got it, how it works, what he intends to do with it. She acts quickly to save him when he’s about to get killed by activating weapons one of their jets. Carol is an excellent pilot, but doesn’t believe he can beat the other test pilots, since they’ve been kicking her but all week. She used every maneuver she could think of to elude them, and doesn’t think Hal can evade them either (her own experiences shaping her expectations). Though businesslike, she cares about Hal deeply, she just doesn’t talk about it. She also doesn’t let her feelings about him get in the way of her decisions; she makes rational choices despite being annoyed with him, because it’s the sensible thing to do. Carol has strong morals and beliefs that she adheres to, most of which…

Enneagram: 1w2 so/sp

… stem out of her perfectionism. She sees being mature, sensible, and dependable as an honorable virtue, and it annoys her that he’s always late for work, irresponsible, reckless, and destructive. His haphazard lifestyle and tendency of running away from anything that threatens him with stability irritates and baffles her. Carol lectures him several times on being more of a “grown up,” and gives him a powerful pep talk about seeking courage, staying put (rather than running off), and finding his “Courageous” side (which she admits that he does have). She sees how he could improve himself and do good in the world, and pushes him toward that, advocating for him, giving him second chances, and forgiving his mistakes even when she disagrees with his tactics (her 2 wing).