Function Order: Se-Fi-Te-Ni

Perseus learns as he goes through life, adopting battle techniques and figuring out how to do things while adapting to his environment, defeating evil creatures, and killing monsters in the underworld and in the realms above. He is quick to leap in and slay things, throw himself headfirst into reckless situations, and confidently fly down Kronos’ throat to deliver a killing blow, not to mention slicing off Medusa’s head (cleverly looking into a metallic shield while doing it, to avoid her eyes) and then thrusting it into the Kraken’s face. He has a “fight like a man, not like a god” mentality that causes him to reject Zeus’ assistance; Perseus chooses his own battles, and his own way of fighting even if it puts him at a severe disadvantage out of his own stubbornness. He refuses to use any of his father’s gifts until absolutely necessary, out of resentment that Zeus abandoned him and let Hades kill his mortal family. He has a begrudging sense of responsibility to the human race, enough to risk his life time and again to save them from divine destruction. But he loops into Te a lot, and becomes callous — he sees Medusa as someone to kill and doesn’t seem moved by her tragic back story of a raped and wronged woman. He needs her head, she’s out to kill him, so all is fair. Perseus threatens to throw the witches’ eyeball off the cliff unless they give him the information he covets. He trusts his hunches, his “gut” a lot – he senses when things are “amiss,” and when not to trust others, but doesn’t show a lot of insight beyond that.

Enneagram: 8w9 so/sp

Perseus won’t bend his knee to anyone or let them tell him what to do. He refuses to cow to his father, even though Zeus is a god and could strike him from the face of the earth. He defies Hades to his face and threatens to kill him. He shows fearlessness in the face of all rivals, including other demigods and gods, some of which beat him to a bloody pulp, but he never begs for mercy. Instead, he sets an example for his son in standing firm upon what he believes. Perseus has a softer, passive side that shows more as he gets older. He becomes less resistant to outside influences, more interested in a relationship with his father, and more inclined to show his compassion to those who deserve it.