Function Order: Se-Ti-Fe-Ni

Maxwell make as a lot of short-sighted decisions based on his whims in the moment – for example, his business has failed because he bought up a bunch of bone-dry potential “oil” territories in the hope one of them would yield him a fortune. None has. Once a Saudi prince refuses to give him what he wants, Maxwell ‘wishes’ a giant wall right through the middle of his territory to teach him a lesson, then takes off with his security people – leaving him to face an angry mob furious that a wall has suddenly appeared right through the middle of town. What Maxwell fails to think about is the disastrous long-term consequence of this behavior – he has cut the poorest Egyptians off from their only water source, which will cause them all to either die or start a civil war. Indeed, he grants wishes haphazardly for his own benefit in quest of his goals, without stopping to think about the consequences of any of them (if you grant everyone’s wish, do some of them cancel out each other? It’s not a world that can sustain itself, if everyone gets what they want all the time, is it?). Why is he doing this? In a desperate attempt to strike it rich and prove himself in business. Maxwell wants external approval and success so much, he uses people rather callously to get ahead. He immediately jumps on whatever opportunity he believes will yield him immediate results (including using the entire world as his own personal broadcasting and wish-granting system, to amass his own power).  He chats up and seduces Barbara through flirtations to get at the wish-granting crystal, then charms the entire world, essentially seeing them as a way to “power” up his energy. He wants to reach as many people as possible and doesn’t care what hardships their wishes wreak in his wake, provided their attention is all focused on him. He doesn’t mind removing people’s will and causing them to act like his “spelled” slaves (placing them under his influence, to do his will). Even though it causes his eyes and ears to bleed, Maxwell assumes he can just replace his body parts by getting people to wish he had theirs, a statement that horrifies Diana. He’s oblivious to how much his son matters to him, when he’s over-focused on success, and is even irritated that the boy is spending the weekend with him again (wasn’t he just here?) since it puts a crimp in his plans. Maxwell says yes to everything that will get him toward his goal of earning money, becoming great, and securing advantages for himself. Maxwell is inconsiderate of the masses he has condemned to death at first. It’s only when Diana draws his attention to his son, the only person he truly loves and cares about, that he redacts his wishes and ends the global genocide about to erupt around him. He gives it all up to save one little boy, then rushes to his side to console him, reassure him, and tell him the truth – his daddy isn’t going to be rich or famous, his daddy is kind of a loser, and he’s there because he loves him, not because his son “wished” for him to be there. He has very poor insight, no ability to tell how wishes cancel each other out or even how anything will turn out, in his singular focus on getting what he wants (if every nation arms itself with nuclear warheads, genocide will result and he’ll have no customers to buy his oil, much less an oil field).

Enneagram: 3w2 so/sp

Maxwell is obsessed with becoming famous and having people believe him competent. He wants to earn the respect f everyone and assumes anyone who doesn’t support him is jealous of his success and conspiring against him. It pains him that nothing he has ever tried his hand at has succeeded and that others consider him a failure. He feels much better having them under his control, where he can simply wave his hand and grant them whatever their heart desires the most (while benefitting him in the process. He’s so out of touch with his own motivations, he doesn’t realize what he cares about the most is his son, and ensuring that he is a good dad, unlike his own awful father (who beat his mother and shamed Maxwell for wetting the bed). He causes immense global problems out of his own “ego trip,” but he also really wants to contribute to the world in a meaningful way, is often asking what others he can do for them, and enjoys handing out wishes not only for his own benefit, but the happiness they give others – at first. He “gives away” expensive cars and lets people squander their wishes, when all he really needs is the love of his child.

This character was typed for a reader, per their paid request.