Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

While Adriana has a lot in common with Gil, in terms of them both being emotionally-driven dreamers, she is far more proactive in directly pursuing whatever she wants, due to her Se. She came to Paris to find love, and has been a mistress to several artists and writers (Gil is impressed that she has done so much, he says it takes ‘art groupie’ to a whole other level). She knows how she feels immediately about things and acts on them – like saying she likes Gil’s story because it’s romantic, or going dancing even though it’s late, or running away with Hemingway after a fight with Picasso to “hunt things in Africa.” When she wanders into the Moulin Rouge, in the 1800s, rather than philosophizing like Gil (he says they didn’t have working bathrooms in the past), she immediately decides to stay, because this is something that appeals to her – she wants to live here, to immerse herself in this world, and has confidence that she can adapt to it and fit right in. Adriana has no problem saying goodbye to Gil, because he doesn’t want to come along with her – she doesn’t need him, if he has no interest in sharing the life that she wants to pursue. Her own writings show how quickly she knows her feelings for someone, and the sensual nature of her dreams (he bought me earrings, and we made love!). Adriana has held a dream of an earlier time in her mind all these years, and when she gets it, she jumps at the chance to make it real. She puts no thought into it, and has no rationality in her decision, other than it’s what she wants.

Enneagram: 9w1 sx/so

Adriana is a dreamer, in the same way that Gil is – she is romanticizing and idolizing a time period before her own, and unlike him, being an sx-dom, she runs after it and decides to stay in the 1800s rather than return to the present, because she is chasing after whatever arouses and excites her, in the moment. She is easily influenced, puts up with Picasso’s wild and crazy moods (“no one could live with him”), and accepts him back whenever they have a fight, because she holds no grudges. Adriana is friendly and welcoming, sweet and generous with her attentions, immediately caught up in the romance of the moment, but also stubborn and self-confident, while being permissive of others’ unattractive traits. She has floated from man to man, tolerating their bad behaviors and their wives (“he was married… but I was young and in love!”). She really loves Gil’s book, because it appeals to her nostalgic nature; it seems like a quiet, pleasant kind of story that could suck her into it.