Function Order: Fe-Ni-Se-Ti

Sibylla is both free with her emotions and somewhat guarded in them; she knows her immediate feelings and shares them, but also warns Bailian the first time they meet that she wears two faces, one for the world to see, and the other for in private, but that she will show him the latter most of the time. She has put on a happy face, despite being married to a man she does not love, whom her mother chose for her, and returns to him, after Bailian disappoints her. She is rational enough, and empathetic enough, to know that her son is better off dead than alive, and to realize that Bailin has made a short-sighted and foolish mistake, in not agreeing to be her husband—he could have ruled and kept the peace, but instead, her husband has made war. Sibylla tends to see the larger picture when dealing with others, and she trusts her own insights; she meets Bailian and immediately knows that she will love him, as she loved his father. She also knows at once that she wants him sexually, and shows up at his house, where he further impresses her with his improvements to the barren land he inherited; he has dug wells, created waterways, and is growing crops. She sees him not as a bastard, but as a “knight” when asked what she is looking at. She also focuses more on the desired end results that she wants, than the process; she initially believed she could seduce Bailian, and have him take care of and protect her son, but when he refused to promise to marry her on the condition of her husband’s execution, she rebukes him as not being able to see a larger picture. In the director’s cut, she has a son who becomes diagnosed with the same leprosy that gave her brother a long and painful life, so she has her son mercifully killed to spare him that torment. Left without a personal vision, or a reason to live, she moves into a sense of apathy and dark depression, cutting her hair and losing all interest in life other than to tend the sick. Sibylla’s low Se shows in how willing she is to take risks in her personal life; she says she can do as she pleases as the princess, which means turning up in Bailian’s house, taking advantage of his hospitality, and seducing him immediately. She also tends to make knee-jerk decisions under stress, such as when she returns to her husband and offers him her support in exchange for his knights (“if my son has your knights, you have your wife” and in her decision to kill her son to end his suffering; she is willing to endure hell if it spares him hell on earth). None of these decisions are rational, just compassionate and loyal.

Enneagram: 3w2 sx/so

Sibylla adjusts herself to whatever is required of her, whether that is to be the submissive wife or a loving sister to a brother suffering from an incurable and painful disease. She admits that her face is “false,” and that she shows people what they want to see. Sibylla is also able to put aside her personal feelings, and do whatever is necessary, including participating in her son’s death to spare him a terrible, painful life. She does this, despite loving him more than anything else – and afterward, she completely falls apart and disintegrates into a 9ish apathy. She does nothing but weep, cut off her hair in mourning, and beg Bailin to make up for her mistake, and undo the terrible harm she has done others. She no longer cares about her beautiful clothes or appearance, and dressed in sackcloth, tends the ugly wounds of those torn in battle. When she confesses that she has no purpose anymore, and Bailin tells her that she can come with him, but not as a queen – she adapts to that, giving him what he wants, out of a desire to earn his love and approval. Sibylla craves love, even if she wasn’t given it through her marriage, and seeks it eagerly when she has the chance to get it. She also tries to do her best for the people she encounters, and feels remorse at having hurt them by her own temporary self-centeredness on her son’s behalf.

Stop stumbling around in the dark, not knowing your type or those of your loved ones. Get 16 Kinds of Crazy: The Sixteen Personality Types today!