Function Order: Si-Te-Fi-Ne

Abbie is much more meticulous than Ichabod, has greater faith in procedure, and is more down to earth; where he leaps to conclusions and throws out crazy theories, she has to experience things to believe them. She is also slower than her sister to leap into action—where Jenny’s Se causes her to do things immediately, Abbie is more thoughtful and deliberate. As an example, it takes her many years before she uses her resources to track down the father that abandoned her, and then she does not want to introduce herself to him, since she has to think about what might happen next; it would disrupt his life, and she doesn’t want to ruin what he has with his new family. In that way, she thinks practically. She does not like her life being interrupted by the wild, fantastical things they have to deal with on a daily basis, but as they happen more and more frequently and she becomes okay with her role as a witness, Abbie loosens up and is more able to handle situations as they arise without needing as much time to process them. She wants to gather as much information on a situation as she can, before making a decision on it. When she travels back in time to stop Katrina from rewriting history, she uses her extensive knowledge of Ichabod and all the stories he has told her about his life, to prove to him that she is from the future and that they are friends. She is also more detached than him, and has to remind him several times that the fate of the world is more important than his feelings for his son. It’s about defeating Moloch, even if it means killing his son… or his wife. As a child, Abbie figured that no one would believe them about their vision of a demon in the woods, so she lied about what she saw to avoid going to the nut house, a logical thing to do even though it made her sister upset with her. Many of her decisions are based on the facts, on finding the fastest solution to a problem (destroy the horseman’s allies and find a way to kill him), and to achieve some result; she offers to stay in Purgatory, because she believes Katrina can find a magical way to halt the horseman’s plans. Abbie is also annoyed that this Witness business has interrupted her plans, and after defeating Moloch, goes back to her original idea—to go through Quantico and become an FBI agent. Her emotions rarely service, and she does not talk about her personal life, her feelings about her dad, or her mom’s death easily. Even though Abbie constantly berates her sister for her irresponsible and reckless behavior, she cares deeply about her and tries to protect her whenever possible. She says at one point that if she gets caught one more time stealing something, “you will go to jail for good this time… which is why I’m going to steal it.” Even though she feels guilt for not telling the truth about the creature in the woods, she isn’t able to really talk about it with her sister for years. Abbie slowly opens her mind to new ideas and theorizes about what to do to solve their mystical problems, but still approaches it from a place of staying grounded in what’s possible. She isn’t comfortable with leaving things open-ended, or having no explanation that makes sense.

Enneagram: 6w5 sp/so

Abbie as a child sought security—she knew that what they had seen would never be believed, so she kept her mouth shut about it, causing them to think of her as normal and send her sister to a series of asylums, assuming her to be delusional. Abbie has always felt great guilt over this betrayal, and the disloyalty it implies, but she wanted to be safe. As a cop, she is methodical and careful, not wanting to do anything prematurely, without fully thinking through the ramifications of her actions. She doesn’t even want to disrupt her father’s life, until she’s thought about all the things it could “change” for both of them (she wants what’s best for them all). She is willing to stick out her neck for her family and friends, but often from a place of keeping them out of trouble. Abbie can be fearful, and at times, doubts her own ability to do what she must as a Witness, but always digs inside herself and finds the courage to act. She is slow to engage, quite private about her personal life, and somewhat withdrawn, but also has a warm personality, a desire to connect to others, and feels safest when she is working together with several other people to achieve a common goal (she does her best, when Ichabod, she, her sister, and their boss are all on the same team).