Beautiful Creatures: Lena Duchannes [ISFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Lena is intensely emotional but also extremely private with her feelings. She goes away to be alone after traumatic events (once she explodes the windows in the classroom, Lena retreats to the garden to sort through her emotions). She has no problem shutting Ethan out while she comes to terms with her future fate, deciding for him that it would be best they aren’t together (she won’t permit him to die, so she must give him up). Lena finds it difficult to separate her actions from her emotions; her love for Ethan ultimately decides her choice. She is blunt and refuses to do anything she doesn’t want to do – when her uncle asks her to play the piano for Ethan, she says it’s the wrong century for that; when he asks her to get tea for them, she says that’s also the wrong century. Lena finds it hard not to be open about her true self; she hates hiding the fact that she is a Caster. She is objective and opportunistic. Lena has been in a dozen different schools and adapted to many new environments. She is interested in aesthetics, with a unique clothing style. She decorates her room with invisible poetry and loves to just be with Ethan, hanging out on the back of his car, going to movies, kissing, and discussing their futures (even though she doesn’t feel she has one). Lena doesn’t mind being physical with Ethan and is good at adapting to her environment and using it defensively (saving Ethan from the spell in the garden, fighting off another Dark Caster). She is quick to act (her casting of a spell over Ethan’s home saves his life). Her fixation on the future is negative, and based on the single outcome Lena feels is inevitable: fear that she will go dark and lose herself. No other possibilities enter her mind; Lena cannot see a way around the single truth that female Casters are not free to choose their own destinies. She is so focused on a future event (her 16th birthday) that Lena sometimes has trouble living in the present – but when the time comes, she finds inner strength to develop a new vision for the future not only of herself, but Casters in general. Creative thinking is not her forte; Lena believes what the books tell her, that there is no way out of this mess, so she tries to surrender to it. She acts defensively in tough situations. Her harsh logical judgments, opinions, and statements turn up under stress. Lena is rude to Ethan on their first several meetings, and dismissive of him in order to protect her emotions. Later, she makes a logical, tactical decision to protect him from harm by causing him to forget their romance.

Enneagram: 4w5 sp/so

Lena feels different from other people, and is envious of how easily Ethan connects. She says he doesn’t understand what it’s like to grow up unwanted and different, shuffled around to various schools, to have your future taken away from you, etc. She refuses to do anything unless she feels like doing it, and at one point gets upset and starts crying when Ethan accuses her of being moody and acting like a bitch (she’s mad at him, so she makes a little rain cloud over his head so it will drench him). She wallows in her feelings of being different and feels frustrated but also incapable of doing anything about her future; she assumes she can’t be fixed, that the situation is going to turn out badly, etc. Rather than connect to Ethan at first, she pulls away from him, rebuffing his advances and demanding he leave her alone. She reads to avoid the outer world, and is blunt, sometimes harsh, and thinks little of other people – seeing them as mundane and not worth knowing, thus creating further self-isolation. She comes into her power once she realizes she has control over her own life, and that she can make her own decisions – taking charge of her life rather than avoiding it.

Bel Ami: Georges Duroy [ESFP 4w3]

Function Order: Se-Fi-Te-Ni

Georges is a natural-born opportunist who leaves behind an impoverished life and work as a soldier and immediately plunges himself into a Parisian life, including drinking, gambling, and whoring. He manages to get himself a job at a newspaper despite having no talent for writing and no experience through his social connections, then immediately adopts the proposed idea of a friend’s wife that he could use the women of high society to become more wealthy. Georges starts to seduce them, to get whatever he wants, starting with Clotilde, who cannot stand to make love in his hovel, so she supplies him with a paid “love nest” apartment. Georges sneaks other women in and out, while allowing her to pay for everything, but remains detached from her, despite her falling in love with him, and often sabotages himself with his impulsive and arrogant behavior. Georges’ reaction to the whore he used to bed causes Clotilde to realize he is insincere and cruel and call off their affair for a time; he no sooner helps Madeline bury her husband than he immediately proposes to get his hands on her money, making an obvious social faux pas. After losing his temper at work and being fired, he seduces the editor’s wife to get back his position. Georges also runs away with her daughter, and lets everyone think they spent the night together, so he can marry her and get his hands on her fortune, after he exposes his wife for her adultery. But Georges has a bad habit of being sullen, withdrawn, openly unlikable, and cruel at times – he often lets his women have it verbally and bluntly, by telling them they don’t matter to him, that he no longer has any use for them, and that he despises them. This backfires a lot, but he can always be opportunistic enough to keep himself off the street. Georges has no ability for long-term thinking and pays his future no mind; he has no interest in politics or the ‘vision’ Madeline has for their nation’s future.

Enneagram: 4w3 so/sx

Georges bounces back and forth between arrogance and being unlikable, and trying to appeal to everyone all the time. He is deeply emotional but also self-centered and something of a hypocrite; he feels hurt that his wife conducts affairs, while conducting his own; he wants what he wants, whenever he wants it, but then not “how” he gets it (he wants to make love to her one afternoon when she is busy, so she does, but he doesn’t like her dominating him or not listening to his needs, so he is angry throughout and then has a sulk afterward). As a deeply unhealthy man, he often loses his temper in public and exposes his true face, which is selfish and unkind; but then he rebounds into fake social niceties and becomes obsessed with his position. If rejected or demeaned by anyone, Georges finds a way to show them up, and prove himself superior, even if it’s to deliberately seduce their daughter so he can run away with their money. Sometimes, he is charming, and at other times, he is so openly obviously money-grubbing, socialites are turned off by him. He also looks down on people who fall for his own cons, scorning Virginie when she falls in love with him.

Tick, Tick, Boom: Jonathan Larson [INFP 4w3]

Function Order: Fi-Ne-Si-Te

Jonathan is highly emotional, very aware of how he feels about things, and tries to pour that emotion into his work by focusing on what matters to him, sometimes to the exclusion of what makes sense to his audience. Directors and participants at his first live workshop complain that his story is not linear and seems disconnected, that they can’t find or follow a main thread, because his plot is all over the place. Jonathan has a few things he is deeply passionate about, because they have touched him and the people he cares about, such as AIDs. Even though it’s been eight years of working on the same musical, Jonathan is still hammering away at it, finding it difficult to work on anything else, because this is his baby and brain-child. He keeps his mind busy by writing jingles while he considers whether he could do that for a living – instead of writing the last song for his new musical, even though his friends push him to get after it so he can be done with the process. If he can’t think of anything, he can’t write any of it. Instead, he gets caught up in his feelings about turning thirty and not yet having achieved success. He feels pressured to create something brilliant and share it with the world, but doesn’t completely know how to start doing it, how to launch into the world, or even how to keep himself out of the poorhouse, because he doesn’t look for roommates to pay half the rent. (He has gone through a dozen of them in a couple of years, and is far less practical than his actor friend who went on to work in a company and give up on his dream.) Jonathan struggles between practicality, and an all-or-none approach; he takes a job writing jingles only to throw up his hands and say he can’t do this, and make light of the entire thing, causing him to get thrown out; then turns around and says he’s tired of living hand to mouth, he wants a nice studio apartment and to make money. Though others complain that he has to do what he hates to earn money, he points out to them that it costs a lot to put on a musical.

Enneagram: 4w3 so/sp

Jonathan can be rather self-absorbed at times; when he’s wrapped up in his creative projects, he ignores his girlfriend by not answering her phone calls, and failing to realize she can see from the street that he’s in the apartment and ignoring her calls. He doesn’t really have an answer for her about joining a ballet troupe and dancing in another state, because he doesn’t want to leave New York and his dream to help her pursue hers. He finds it hard to do things he doesn’t want to do, like the unglamorous job of working writing jingles (instead of award-winning musicals), and actively resists incorporating anyone’s ideas into his work that he doesn’t deem worthy, such as award-winning Broadway musical writers or directors. Even then, if his heart isn’t in it, he can’t write it – dragging his feet about composing a song in the second half to link the two wholes into a more cohesive piece of storytelling. Jonathan also battles an almost-constant pressing need to achieve, to show everyone his worth, to get something done, to produce a musical that people want to see, and to make a success of himself. He berates himself for being thirty and not yet having made a success of his career, comparing himself to the “giants” on Broadway and seeing himself as lacking because he can’t finish this musical. He’s devastated when people respond positively to his work, but then shrug at the idea of producing this musical and “can’t wait to hear what he does next,” because this is his whole idea, his life, his identity. It’s hard for him to walk away from it to focus on “what I know” (although, that pushes him to create Rent).

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Dawn Summers [ISFP 4w3]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Dawn is a deep well of emotions; she is easily hurt and upset by the unkindness of others or by being left out of things. Though she desperately wants to connect to people, she often states things that she is feeling that others perceive as somewhat blunt – and then feels bad at times and tries to take them back, such as when she informs Buffy that Spike has the hots for her (Buffy wants to know how, and Dawn says it’s obvious after spending time with him). She has to grieve alone, and doesn’t want to do so in the company of her sister – she needs to process what happened to their mother by accessing her own pain and moving through it. Though Dawn goes through a lot to try and resurrect Joyce, she realizes at the last minute that she can’t stand the thought of what her mother might become, what evil thing might take her form, and tears up the spell so she will never see her again. She feels such a need to be independent, she often fights with her sister about boundaries. Dawn also tends to react based on whatever she is feeling at the moment – despite everyone warning her that resurrection spells are dangerous, she steals the spell book and tries to perform the ritual anyway. She breaks into the Magic Shop to steal Giles’ book that reveals her true nature (as a Key) to her. Dawn tends to rush out of the house or go outside to be alone with her thoughts, sometimes heedless of the danger to herself (she knows the kinds of monsters and creatures Buffy fights, but that doesn’t register in her mind until she’s stuck in a dark alley with one). Dawn has occasional flits of insight, such as when she figures out the truth about Spike’s love for her sister, despite him not saying anything about it, but it’s all based on observing his behavior and picking up on subtle clues. Dawn can be rude under stress or when she’s upset, telling people off, refusing to obey her authority figures, and storming out of the house (refusing to talk about whatever is bothering her), but she also wants to come up with a “plan” from time to time and be part of the group.

Enneagram: 4w3 sp/so

Dawn is somewhat moody and takes everything personally; she fills her journal full of envious thoughts about her sister, resentment toward her getting all the attention Dawn wants, and remarking on how unimpressed she is. She feels alienated and an outcast among the Scooby Gang, and gets very upset regularly because they won’t talk to her, let her know what’s going on, or explain anything to her, much less allow her to do magic – so she often sets out to do those things anyway without their permission. When she finds out she is a “Key,” Dawn has a total meltdown. She cuts her wrist to determine if she bleeds actual blood, she has serious doubts about her own past and doesn’t see any point in going to school (why would a non-person need an education?), and she screams at her family to get out of her room. After her mother dies, Dawn insists on seeing the body before she will believe her sister. She then abandons Buffy to spend time with Willow and Tara after the funeral and wants to resurrect her mother using forbidden dark magic. She no longer wants to go to school, and refuses to listen to Buffy or obey her until she finds out they might put her in foster care, if she doesn’t behave herself. She’s very easily hurt and insulted. Dawn also is ambitious, self-confident, and wants attention from others – she will go out of her way to try and make them like her, while still feeling as if she’s not being included.

Sweeney Todd: Benjamin Barker / Sweeney Todd [ISFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Todd is utterly consumed with his emotions and the rage he feels toward those who wronged him and led to his imprisonment and his wife’s death; he is so ruled by these feelings, he fails to notice or read the people around him who wish to manipulate him for their own advantage (Mrs. Lovett). His lack of a moral center beyond his own sharp judgments give him free license to murder people, because in his mind, none of them deserve the right to live. He expresses severe subjective judgments upon the city as he returns to it, and only spares those he either likes, or who appeal to his more merciful nature – or sometimes, such as in Mrs. Lovett’s case, who give him rational reasons to keep them around (she says they need the boy, someone to do the fetching and carrying). Once he lands his hands on his old razors, Todd wants to slice his enemy’s throat open… and practices on anyone who enters his shop. This brutal, barbaric, and bloody practice could be discovered at any moment if someone walked through the door at the wrong time – but Todd doesn’t worry about that, since he feels confident in dealing with things in the sensory world without much warning; when someone threatens to blackmail and expose him, he bashes his head in with a kettle, throws his body in a trunk, and decides to dump it into the meat grinder. Todd throws Mrs. Lovett into an open oven and lets her burn to death, when he realizes she lied to him. He is impatient and erratic. Mrs. Lovett has to convince him that “good things come to people who wait,” since he’s already angry about the judge not having come for his shave two days into the week. His vision of defeating his enemy blinds him to drawing intuitive conclusions; he never once suspects his wife survived, nor that Mrs. Lovett has misled him, nor that the old woman is his wife! He’s too fixated on killing his enemy … and almost destroys his own daughter in the process! His inferior Te shows in his brutal desire to ‘get his revenge done,’ without ever stopping to question anything around him. He also lets Mrs. Lovett do a lot of thinking for him (what to do with the bodies; why let good meat go to waste?).

Enneagram: 4w5 sx/sp

Todd is the embodiment of an unhealthy 4’s mentality that you never forget, forgive, or get over the things that traumatized you about the past. Even though he has sailed the world and seen its wonders, he could not enjoy any of them because he was wallowing in hatred, anger, and resentment toward the man who robbed him of his “naïve” existence within a happy little family. Rather than accept what happened to him and move on, Todd allows it to turn him toward bitterness and violence. Every waking moment, he thinks about the wrongs done to him and covets the desire to avenge them by killing the two men responsible for these crimes. He sings about his hatred for London as a cesspool “full of people who are full of shit,” and decides to kill as many of them as possible while he waits for his chance to get the judge. Even when Anthony falls in love with is daughter, and comes up with a scheme to free her from the judge’s clutches, Todd doesn’t see this as a chance at redemption – rather, he mourns the daughter he will never see and uses her to get to the judge. He has a deep, melancholy nature – eve in Mrs. Lovett’s fantasy about their future together, she paints him as moping in corners and looking downtrodden, rather than joyously participating in their lives together. Todd wavers between intense emotions and intense detachment. He cares nothing for the innocent men whose throats he cuts, and instead figures out how to help Mrs. Lovett make a profit off them. He wallows in his own pain, while ignoring everyone else’s. He also has some twisted ideas about life, manifested through his many songs which take a dark turn. Once he finds out Mrs. Lovett betrayed him, he turns on her, then cradles his dead wife in his arms and gives himself up to death.

The Princess Bride: Buttercup [INFP 4w3]

Function Order: Fi-Ne-Si-Te

Buttercup is so intensely private about her feelings that she doesn’t even tell the “farm boy” that she loves him; instead, she comes up with reasons to have him do things for her, rather than do them for herself. The narrator says she figures out one day that by saying “as you wish,” he is actually saying “I love you,” even though he never said it to her. She agrees to marry Humperdink, even though she knows she doesn’t love him and never will; her heart belongs to Westley alone. Her emotions dictate her decisions, including her decision to commit suicide in the honeymoon suite. When the Dread Pirate Roberts accuses her of betraying true love, Buttercup retaliates violently, insisting he doesn’t know her or her feelings, and cannot possibly imagine the depths of “true love,” with the implication that she alone feels these things. Buttercup likens her lover’s eyes to the sea after a storm. She is also somewhat naïve and almost pathetically inept when it comes to reacting to the physical environment – though she leaps into the water to get away from the ship, when they reach the top of the cliffs, she merely lays there, senseless, while the men cut the rope of the man trying to save her. In the fire swamp, Westley has to save her multiple times because she is oblivious to the environment – she doesn’t notice the ROUS’s until they leap on him, the lightening sand until she falls into it, or the fire bursts. When he’s attacked by a rodent, she stands there in shock and has no clue what to do or how to help him, merely pushing the rodent away with a stick when it comes after her (and shouting to be rescued). Buttercup senses that the guards are going to kill Westley, and she can’t have that, so she barters for their life, promising to marry the prince if he will let Westley go back to his ship. She naively assumes he will keep his word, but later figures out that he hasn’t, and though she has no reason to believe otherwise, firmly remains convinced that her lover will save her, because their love is so deep and passionate and true, nothing can stand in its path. She figures out after the prince shows confusion about his “four fastest ships” that he never sent word to her love in the first place. She is not always aware of danger until it is too late, since she assumes the worst of no one. Buttercup spends a lot of time looping into Si, in how she can’t move on from her lover’s death even years later. She remains convinced that he is the only person she will ever love, that there is no one else for her, that she can do nothing to change her circumstances. She may as well remain true to his memory, rather than adapting to the outside world. Rather than talk about her feelings, she acts on them. She is decisive in what she wants and able to articulate it, as well as insults toward Humperdink, without hesitation. Buttercup is not a creative thinker, and is stumped by problems – she relies on Westley to think his way out of their plight, because she can’t often do it herself. Though, she does make some plans and tries to carry them out (“I intend to kill myself…”)… usually led by her feelings.

Enneagram: 4w3 so/sx

Buttercup is intensely emotional and crippled by loss. She neither sleeps nor eats for three days after learning her lover has died, then refuses to move on even though she believes he is dead – declaring that her heart has withered in her chest, and she will “never love again.” She refuses to open her heart to anyone else, seeing herself as damaged, as if a piece of her soul has been torn out and thrown asunder. When she cannot be with her lover, and when he does not come for her, she intends to commit suicide – if she cannot have what she wants, she will kill herself instead, a bit of an overreaction from the perspective of the other characters, but she embraces these intense feelings. She is a bit selfish at the start, ordering the farm boy around with no thought for his feelings and seeing him as meant to serve her, until it develops into a more intense connection. Even though she has no love for the prince, Buttercup goes along with his desire to marry her, knowing she will become the queen. She can be volatile, reactive, and outgoing, taking matters into her own hands to save herself when need be, but then lapsing into a sense of helplessness, in need of rescue.

Paid Request: The Shop Around the Corner: Klara Novak [INFP 4w3]

Function Order: Fi-Ne-Si-Te

Klara prides herself on being an intellectual full of deep thoughts; Alfred says she talks about more interesting things in her letters, and has a different perspective, than anyone he has ever met. She’s a full-blown romantic, easily insulted by criticisms and quarrelsome when pushed too far. Instead of waiting to hear Alfred out, she becomes insulted at any insinuation that he doesn’t like her wardrobe, and accuses him of trying to control her. She shares whatever she is thinking without a filter, causing her to insult him several times (sometimes intentionally, and at other times, without intending to). Klara doesn’t like to be managed or told what to do. She doesn’t have any interest in knowing any details about the man she’s writing to, because in her mind that’s wasteful of their words – she would rather discuss ideas. She sees romanticism where others don’t, and sells a woman on the idea of a musical cigarette box being a weight loss assistant (each time you reach for a piece of candy without thinking, the music will remind you of your over-indulgence!). Klara isn’t always rational in her thinking; she accuses Alfred of having ‘taken my personality away’ by forcing her to abide by the store roles, and sees him as condescending, because of how she feels about him. In reality, he’s much more than that, but she never guesses his true identity as the man she’s fallen in love with through letters, nor sees through his attempts to manipulate her emotions, because of her willful desire to misunderstand him. She models her life after her imagination and the books she has read, and can be quite tactless when she’s mad.

Enneagram: 4w3 so/sp

Klara gets accused by Alfred of being “mean and spiteful,” and admits that she was indeed that way, because she felt attracted to him at the start. Not knowing how to cope with this, she modeled her behavior after a heroine she read about in a book, who was mean to the man she liked and it caused him to fall at her feet. Instead, it backfired on Klara and caused them to have nothing but arguments. She goes by what she feels most of the time, and gets wrapped up in it, including being unable to come to work when she doesn’t “feel well” (has had her heart broken), but the minute she has an explanation and feels loved again, she’s quite eager to return to work. Klara can be charming and approachable when she wants to be, appealing to Alfred in an attempt to charm him and get him to give her the night off so she can meet her penpal, although it backfires due to her natural bluntness (they start a fight). She gets romantically infatuated with a man she has never met, creates an imaginary scenario around him, and then feels devastated when Alfred crushes it, since reality isn’t quite what she imagined (though she’s happy to find out he lied to her about the whole thing). She’s a tad bit snobbish in how superior she sees her penpal to the man she works with and tries to impress him with her letter-lover’s intellect.

The Vampire Diaries: Jeremy Gilbert [ISFP 4w5]

Functional Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Jeremy has trouble at first with his girlfriend, because in his opinion, she lets Tyler treat her like “crap” – he asserts time and again that she ought to be true to herself and not need other people’s approval to be content; he tends to be blunt and open with his feelings, but also withdrawn and private (he closes out Elena and his aunt, Jenna, when he’s going through anguish after a death). He tends to prioritize his own emotional needs and desires above others – such as when he uses another girl to gain information about vampires, intending to die and become one to be with Vicky, leaving the new girl in the lurch. He lives in the moment. He’s an artist who loves to translate what he sees into his own unique style. He has trouble with over-indulgence in drugs and alcohol, but less so than Vicky; he even complains that “all we ever do is get high all the time.” Jeremy wants more out of life than that. Whatever feeling he’s having, clouds his entire life – he’s stuck there, wallowing in it, unable to see a way out, or convinced he must do a single thing (like become a vampire) to survive. He has cutting insights into other people and intuitive hunches that Elena is keeping things from him. His inferior Te tends to be frank, honestly assessing situations and delivering zingers when he’s upset, but Jeremy slacks off in school, does not see the point of studying, and has no ambition.

Enneagram: 4w5 sx/sp

Jeremy is something of an emo stereotype; he sees no reason to be like anyone else and actively resists them. He judges his girlfriend harshly for wanting to be liked or admired by other people, and compromising herself to do it. He doesn’t bother to make friends with anyone he doesn’t like, and looks down on them all as shallow and uninteresting. Jeremy doesn’t easily move on from his pain, but dwells in it, broods about it, and draws dark art about it. He’s willing to become a vampire just to connect, and deeply hurt when he discovers he’s being used by a vampire to gain more information. He is affronted to realize Elena had his memories taken away from him. He’s isolated, withdrawn, and has a dark sense of aesthetics. He even admits that he finds drinking and getting high to be wasteful of his time and boring, inferring that he wishes they had something deeper and more meaningful to do.

Clash/Wrath of the Titans: Hades [INFJ 4w5]

Function Order: Ni-Fe-Ti-Se

Hades is a master manipulator who much prefers to do things from the shadows than engage in hand-to-hand combat. Though bitter about his imprisonment in hell, in comparison to the heavens and the sea – the realms of his brothers – he watches and waits for his chance to strike at Zeus. When the humans tear down the statue of Zeus above their harbor, Hades appears to them, destroys them all, and sinks Perseus’ boat. He then persuades Zeus to let him do more damage, by convincing his brother the humans will learn respect for the gods once more. In reality, Hades intends to arouse their fear; fear feeds him power, not the other gods. When it becomes clear Perseus intends to thwart his intentions and kill his kraken, Hades convinces a king punished by the gods to do his will and kill Perseus. He uses cruel, manipulative words to do this (you failed to kill this child of Zeus, so you murdered your wife for no reason; but here’s your chance to even the score). In the second film, Hades kidnaps and imprisons Zeus to drain his power to fuel their father’s restoration, but he also finds it hard to watch Zeus being abused by his son and puts a stop to it. He can’t stand by and watch him beaten mercilessly. Hades makes many of his decisions from an emotional place—revenge, wrath, and also forgiveness. When Zeus asks him for forgiveness, Hades gives it to him—and immediately switches sides. He gives his brother enough life force to save him (temporarily) so they can fight for the very humans he wanted to destroy a few years earlier. He makes impulsive decisions under stress, including his battle tactics.

Enneagram: 4w5 sp/sx

Hades suffers from a crippling envy and resentment toward his brother for possessing what he cannot have—Zeus tricked him and banished him to the underworld, while he rules on Olympus, so Hades decides to do everything in his power to get back at him. He makes all his decisions from his emotions—his resentment, and later, his acceptance of Zeus asking forgiveness and begging Hades to forgive him. He has stewed in his own juices for centuries, and gleefully takes the chance to get back at Zeus by stealing his prayers away from him. Darkly morbid, negative, and even cruel, Hades thinks up nasty punishments for the humans, including unleashing his kraken and demanding they sacrifice their princess to it. But he also had a lot of fearful motivations – once he realizes what he’s done in releasing their father from his centuries-old imprisonment, fearful for his life, he reunites with Zeus and fights alongside him to defeat him.

To Walk Invisible: Emily Bronte [INFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Ne-Si-Te

Emily spends much of her time writing intense poetry, which she doesn’t want to share with other people, because in her mind, that cheapens the emotions of it. She gets into a furious argument with Charlotte when Charlotte invades her privacy and reads her poems without permission. She doesn’t at first want to contribute to her siblings’ book of poetry, since she sees that as trite. Whenever she’s truly upset, she forbids others from speaking to her while she processes her emotions. Even though she can be furious at Branwell much of the time, Emily is also the first one to offer him help on his worst days. Her poems are full of rich, raw metaphors and broad connections. She retains a sense of dreaminess and a rich connection to nature and her own imagination. She contributed much to their stories as children, and like Anne, continues to write about their invisible world as an adult. She’s most excited when sharing with Anne an “idea” she heard about, a real event which she bases Wuthering Heights on, right down to the major characters. She draws much literary inspiration from her own life, using Branwell to influence aspects of Heathcliffe’s nature. Emily takes daily walks with the dogs, does most of the housekeeping and cooking for the family – and seems to enjoy it. She’s fairly content to remain at home. Emily is sharp-tongued and inclined to put people in their place whenever she’s upset, sometimes to the extent of “laying down ground rules” (“You don’t speak to me, you don’t address me, you don’t speak of me!”); she rarely does anything she doesn’t want to do, even when it causes discord among her sisters. Emily is extremely hard-working, and finishes what she starts.

Enneagram: 4w5 sx/sp

Emily writes extremely dark things and loves to dwell on them (Wuthering Heights is considered risqué for the period, because it revolves around morbid themes and/or a man digging up the dead woman he loves to “embrace” her … or maybe do more than that). She admits that she loves dark, tragic, sinister things and feels a kind of thrill at the idea of evil. She refuses to share her poetry easily, is easily offended by her sister poking around in her room (and angrily confronts them all, demanding to know who did it), and also refuses to reveal her pen name when the others want to do so, because “your writing has naught to do with me!” She won’t go to London with them and clear up the mess of the publisher putting the wrong name on the manuscript. In this way, Emily can be self-absorbed and temperamental, only concerned with her own feelings and inconsiderate of her siblings, prioritizing her own self above their needs (they want her support, she refuses and won’t give it). She forms a lot of harsh judgments about people, looking down on them for their subpar material, but is also secretive, reclusive, and withdrawn.

Paid Request: Twelfth Night: Orsino [ISFP 4w3]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Orsino is an emotional fellow, who can’t bring himself to court Olivia on his own, so he sends a guy pal to do it for him, in the hope that his eloquent friend will be able to woo her with the words he cannot produce. Against his will, he finds himself being drawn to this “man” because of his “feminine attributes,” and when he realizes it’s a woman, promptly transfers his romantic affections from Olivia onto Viola. Most of them were for superficial reasons such as her appearance and a romanticized view of Olivia. He saw her as beautiful, and got lost in the moment and wanted to make the most of it. Orsino leapt at the chance to break through Olivia’s self-imposed seven years of mourning by asking “Sebastian” to visit her on his behalf. He spends a lot of his time pining, but also doing manly things such as horseback riding, playing billiards, going hunting, and suchlike. He spends much of the play dwelling on superficial things, and not seeing what’s going on right in front of him – namely, that his super wonderful friend isn’t a man at all, but is in fact a woman who is falling in love with him! Nor did he expect Olivia to be so fickle as to fall in love with the “man” he sent to court her on his behalf. But once the truth comes out, he hasn’t much trouble adapting, switching his focus in life, and choosing a new future for himself.

Enneagram: 4w3 sx/sp

Orsino is a hopeless romantic who is pining after someone just out of reach for most of the story. He’s built up a narrative about this beautiful, perfect creature and become obsessed with her, even though he knows she’s beyond his grasp due to her period of mourning. Rather than go to her himself and risk rejection or humiliation by her unfathomable refusal, he sends someone else to speak words into her ear, present her with gifts, and do his wooing for him. This allows him to remain at a distance and hold onto the perfect idea of her he has in his head. But the closer he gets to her, the more he divides his affections and starts to become fond of Viola, as if he wants to sabotage his own prospective happiness. He just needs to “pine.” He’s theatrical, open with his emotions, and tends toward drama in his bouts of disappointment, but also is somewhat vain and self-assured.

This character was typed for a reader, per their paid request.

Sunshine Cleaning: Norah [ISFP 7w6]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Norah has kept feelings about her mother’s suicide locked away in her head for a long, long time, and they have somewhat derailed her life—she is quick to stomp out of a job when she’s fired for dropping a tray (after tripping), but she rarely showed up on time in the first place, preferring to hang out with her friends, do drugs, and sometimes drink and sleep in rather than go to work. When her sister starts a business in which they clean up dead people’s messes for a living, Norah initially doesn’t want to do it, then starts having feelings about the environment she’s in. Finding photos of an older woman and her daughter makes Norah wonder if the woman has loved ones, and if they know she’s dead. Against her sister’s advice, she finds the woman’s daughter and makes friends with her, because she wants to give her the photos but doesn’t know how to not be awkward about it. When it finally happens, it goes badly and Norah gets upset, because she didn’t know how to separate her own feelings from what happened (“I wish I had my mom…” so the assumption is, this woman may wish she knew about hers). Norah takes her friend “tresling,” where you stand on a crossbeam under the railroad tracks when a train rushes past, since it’s the “ultimate thrill.” She also lights a candle to clean the smell out of a dead person’s house and, in chasing a kitten outside, accidentally sets the place on fire. She tells her nephew scary stories to thrill him with, and ignores the fact that his mother told her not to, because it gives him nightmares. Norah takes a friend to a house party, where all the people there want to do is get drunk and make out. She ends the film by going on a road trip with her cat. She has sought meaning all her life, searching for it in temporary distractions and pleasures, but also wanting to know why her mother abandoned her and what it means to her identity. Norah shows a lot of inferior Te. She believes her accidental setting of the house on fire proves how unequipped she is to deal with the real world, and sees herself as inept. She angrily storms off and leaves her sister to deal with a poop-soaked mattress after her sister laughs at her for falling on it.

Enneagram: 7w6 sp/sx

Norah hasn’t been the same since her mother died, and she’s allowed that experience to Norah has been running away from things her entire life, through distractions; she is somewhat irresponsible and cannot hold down a job, because she gets bored. She doesn’t want to do hard work, and feels like a “screw up” when she makes a mistake and burns down a client’s home (while she’s making sure a kitten is all right and doesn’t get lost). She overdoes it on drinking and thrills, going up on the trestle to feel the rain roar past, rather than sit with and deal with the pain of her mom’s death (she half-sobs about it, but also loves the thrill of being up there, inches from death). Whenever she makes a mistake, she makes excuses and/or starts to beat herself up for it (disintegrating temporarily into 1 “I am a bad person” self-accusations). At the end of the movie, she goes on a road trip with her new kitten just to avoid everything she’s left behind and “get away.” Her 6 wing is fun and family-minded, but also insecure. She doesn’t want to do things on her own if they are hard.

Bumblebee: Charlie [ISFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Charlie works on the car her dad loved so much, in an effort to connect to him and let him “hear me” (if she can get it started), but also to work through her feelings. Her mother has remarried and moved on, but Charlie cannot. She quickly identifies with and befriends Bumblebee, the Transformer she finds hiding in her uncle’s service garage. She gives him a human-like personality, insists that he is “not just a machine,” fights for his right to be himself, and even takes his rejection of her musical choices in stride. She’s so wrapped up in her feelings at first, she fails to notice the boy next door likes her, and even at the end, she’s not quite ready to hold his hand. It has taken her several years to be able to talk about her dad dying of a heart attack, and how upset it made her, and she only confides in Bumblebee because he seems to understand and empathize with her. Charlie is very physical, always looking for things to do (fixing cars, working in a busy carnival, chasing down her mother and pretending to care about the family dog, driving with “no hands” and thinking it’s awesomely fun when Bumblebee outruns the cops after they’re almost caught for speeding, enjoying standing on the seat while joyriding, and turning off the power during the Transformers fight, then jumping into the flooded pathway to make sure Bumble is all right after his trouncing). She shows flits of intuition, such as when she finally figures out why Bumble is playing with the radio (“you’re trying to talk, aren’t you?”). And she can be quite blunt under stress, such as when she yells at Bumble after he has trashed their home while being told to stay home and hide today.

Enneagram: 4w5 sp/sx

Charlie has not moved on from her father’s death, but has allowed it to take over her life. She gave up swimming because it triggers her into having memories of his heart attack. Her new stepdad annoys her by complaining that she never smiles and tries to get anyone to like her, going so far as to give her a self-help book for her birthday. Charlie is caught up in her own pain enough to not notice a boy trying to get her attention. She identifies with Bumblebee because they are both broken – him with his vocal cords gone and her with her dad being gone. She learns through the story to face up to her loss, accept it, and begin to heal as she moves forward in her life. Her 5 wing is introverted and withdrawn, spends most of its time encouraging her to stay away from other people and not create dependencies, and is somewhat afraid. She doesn’t want Bumble to get caught or reveal himself and wind up being taken away from her, so she shows flits of cautiousness.

Paid Request: Enchanted April: Caroline [ISFP 4w3]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Caroline is wrapped up in her own feelings and wants to be left alone; she comes to the villa with the express intention of not having people talk to her, and being away from her friends. She says it’s lovely to go someplace with strangers, so they don’t talk about anyone she already knows. When Miss Fisher is annoyed with her small deception about a headache (she just wants to lie out in the sun and doze), Caroline tells her “isn’t it lovelier to come out here and find me well, than find me ill?” She’s tired of the same old things and people and needs to get away, since it’s boring to only socialize with people you know. She picks the nicest room for herself when she arrives, and has the maid take out the second bed (not realizing and not really minding that the maid crams it into someone else’s room). She says she needs to stroke her ruffled feathers smooth again, and set herself straight. She asserts her gentle but firm opinions easily (“I hate authors, don’t you?”). When the other girls consider inviting a guest, she assures them she has no desire to invite anyone she knows since the intention was to get away from everyone. Caroline is a socialite who gets absorbed into whatever she is doing, even if that is laying outside on a hammock and holding a parasol. She is used to little luxuries and pleasures, including running up the bills a little bit because she isn’t thinking about the expense of their meals. When Mrs. Fisher asks her what they should do about the bills, she suggests doing nothing! And then offers to pay them. She has been too much in the world, being “grabbed” by men, and now wants to withdraw and not give it what it “wants from me.” Caroline has come to think and contemplate, and finds herself slipping into low Ni observations, including how her mind “slips sideways” in Italy. She doesn’t find happiness until she meets a man who doesn’t care about her face, but instead wants to love her for her inner self.

Enneagram: 4w3 so/sx

Caroline has everything and yet isn’t happy. She looks upon the easy satisfaction of Lotty and marvels at it, wondering why she cannot be happy in the way that others are happy. She resents being beautiful even though it has gotten her further in life, because it causes people to focus on her face rather than her soul. She wants to be “wonderful inside.” She asks why she isn’t satisfied, and only feels drawn to a man once she realizes he has been in love with Rose and has no interest in her physical appearance (wanting and feeling drawn to what she cannot have, and disdaining what she can have – all the men chasing her). Her 3 wing loves luxury and thinks she deserves the best of everything. She perks up and plays a role whenever she has to, including pretending she has never met Rose’s husband before.

This character was typed for a reader, per their paid request.

Anna Karenina: Anna Karenina [ENFJ 4w3]

Function Order: Fe-Ni-Se-Ti

Anna focuses a great deal on “social appropriateness,” and that for a time keeps her from having an affair, because she isn’t sure how others might receive it and is considerate of how it might harm her relationship with her son and/or threaten her ability to see him on a frequent basis. She tried early in her marriage to establish an emotional relationship with her husband only for that to fail—she sees him as cold, disinterested, unfeeling, and uninterested in the things that she is most passionate about. She tries to convince her sister-in-law to take back her husband even after he shames her with the maid, insisting it would be better for all their children. At first, she tells Vronsky to leave her alone, then how much he means to her, and keeping a running commentary of her increasing fears, emotional responses, and worries up as the story unfolds. She cares to have society accept her and not reject her, taking personally the shunning at the opera because of their double standard (they are fine with affairs, just not flouting them in public). She can be forgiving and persuasive, sharing with Kitty her excitement over Kitty’s impending marriage. She feels tremendous guilt at cheating on her husband (at first) and in stealing Kitty’s love, but ultimately her own desire for love overwhelms her sense of duty and obligation. She has a strong focus on the future, both in planning for it with optimism and in fearing the worst. She is forever thinking out loud and planning for her and Vronsky’s life together. She sees a version of the truth of her husband his intentions and believes it, even though she assigns the wrong motives to him (cruel ones, rather than his altruistic sense of certainty that her lover will eventually abandon her, leaving him to pick up the pieces). Anna becomes convinced without proof that Vronsky is either cheating on her, or intends to, with a princess he has met in society. She is obsessed with the distant future – not wanting to abandon her child, but also wanting happiness in the present (Se); excitedly planning her future with Vronsky, then fearing the day he will leave her. She can’t seem to either live in the future or the present, showing a strong fight between her intuition and sensing. Anna deeply needs sexual connections and passion to feed her Se, which soon grows bored with Karenin’s tepid lifestyle. Anna proves unable to analyze herself or her motives, spiraling further and further into paranoia and irrational conclusions that ultimately drive her to her final desperate action (inferior Ti).

Enneagram: 4w3 so/sx

Anna seems determined to thwart her own happiness at every turn. She denies herself Vronsky at first out of a sense of familial obligation, and then when she allows herself to have him and their affair, she assumes she must be damned, and that it will not turn out well. When she goes away with her lover, she cannot allow herself to be happy in the moment, because she is thinking about wanting to be home with her son and afraid of her husband divorcing her and denying her the ability to see her child. But when they return home, she cannot be happy there, either, because her husband won’t give her a divorce. She assigns mean motivations to him, turning him into the villain. Anna deals with intense feelings of shame, which turn to hatred for her husband when she feels she is in the wrong, and indebted to him for his forgiveness. When Anna believes she’s about to die, she disintegrates into 2 – begging her husband for forgiveness, and being emotionally needy on her deathbed; she later does the same with Vronsky, fearing he’ll leave her and becoming clingy, needy, and desperate, trying to be whatever he needs so he will not leave her. She eventually commits suicide, because she cannot live with herself anymore and feels like she has no one. Her 3 wing cares about appearances, wants to be seen as appropriate and fashionable, and doesn’t like being socially isolated for her love affair. She feels flattered by a handsome man’s affections and easily becomes whatever he wants her to be.