Paid Request: The Suicide Squad: Christopher Smith / Peacemaker [ESTJ 1w9]

Function Order: Te-Si-Ne-Fi

Peacemaker is a straightforward communicator, who makes an awful lot of assumptions based on what he knows, and of his own personal experience – like assuming Cleo is going to be lazy because she’s a millennial (that’s why she’s sleeping in her cell), or asking Polka-Dot man if he’s called that because his power is to throw polka-dots at people (actually… it’s true, which Peacemaker immediately figures out when the man doesn’t answer him). He has a theme of ‘liberty’ ongoing and argues fiercely in favor of it, driven when he questions Bloodsport’s leadership skills (with the assumption that his own are superior – along with his superior assassination techniques, and his contempt for a man who accepts money to kill people). He mows through people, showing off his techniques and skill, without remorse or thinking about whether they should die. One of his favorite tricks is bullets rigged to explode, showing his perverse sense of humor. He often says off the wall things, using disturbing metaphors about body parts and linking it to liberty, questioning whether the mission has to do with butt-holes, etc. He also has poor inferior Fi, in the sense that he becomes morally outraged at the idea of killing people for money, but has decided to kill them for peace himself. Since he has no real conscience, he has no problem killing others on his squad to ‘protect the mission’ and do what he has been told by his superior officer.

Enneagram: 1w9 so/sx

A deeply misguided sociopath, Peacemaker devoted his life to being a “pacifist diplomat” who grew so committed to peace, he decided to enforce it by killing all those who stand in its way. He feels self-righteous about this decision, because it’s less base than killing people for money (he dislikes Bloodsport because of this, and the two men engage in a skills-related pissing contest to prove each other superior). He is confident, even cocky, and self-assured, making immediate decisions and choosing to enforce peace through violence. In a misguided way, he thinks he’s doing the “right thing,” even if that involves a massive cover-up and killing the people he has grown closer to over the last few days. He over-emphases his 9 wing, which also numbs him to anything he dislikes or finds unpleasant; he reframes it into a positive self-image, to embolden his ego.   

White Christmas: Betty Haynes [ISFJ 1w9]

Function Order: Si-Fe-Ti-Ne

Betty is a sensible and down to earth performer, who has grown up with her sister and is familiar enough with her to know when she is up to shenanigans, such as using their brothers’ name to get the most famous performers on the stage to check out their show. She has a quiet calmness about her that makes her attractive to Bob, mostly because her head isn’t full of future prospects of show business, so much as a desire to have a normal lifestyle – to become a wife and have children. She assumes she has to look after her sister, and puts a lot of time and effort into taking care of her. Even though it devastates her when her sister announces her engagement, Betty puts on a brilliant smile and congratulates her – showing the “expected” emotions for the situation rather than giving in to her genuine feelings. She is upfront with her emotions at all times, telling her sister that she will go fetch a sandwich not because she wants one, but because Judy won’t let her sleep otherwise; telling Bob how much she likes him and that she’s so happy that he’s doing such a wonderful thing to the general (she admires it). She knows the financial sacrifice he is making in the process… but her inferior Ne creates a worst-case scenario, based on her limited interaction with him and her own negative expectations, that Bob is going to profit off what he’s doing. She doesn’t question what the maid overheard on the phone, or ask Bob to explain himself, simply leaps to the wrong conclusion that it’s true and punishes him for it.

Enneagram: 1w9 so/sp

She has a moralistic streak, does not want to be seen as inappropriate, and immediately tells Bob the truth, that her sister used their brother’s name to send a letter to him, to come and see their show, since she has brought them there on false pretenses. She admits that she only wants to take care of her sister, and thus she has neglected doing anything about her own life in the process – she has not pursued her own romantic attachments, because she assumes she must look after someone else (which also makes it easier to avoid stepping outside her comfort zone). Betty does not want to argue with Bob, and when they disagree the first time they meet, she says their acquaintance will be too short to waste time arguing, thereby bringing them into peace with one another again. Even though she is furious with him, when she erroneously believes he is using the general to further his own career, Betty refuses to come right and accuse him of anything, so she passive-aggressively refuses to talk to him instead, and even boards a train and leaves him behind without saying goodbye to anyone (including her sister; though she puts on a happy face for her, she wastes no time in finally detaching from her and getting a solo career far away from them all, to punish them and put some distance between them).

Paid Request: Black Panther: T’Challa [ISFJ 1w9]

Function Order: Si-Fe-Ti-Ne

Unlike his sister, who wants to overturn everything about their culture and has very little respect for ‘how things are done,’ T’Challa is “old school” and has a strong faith in ‘how things have always been’ with his people, and believes in their traditions of his people to the point of self-sacrifice; he agrees to let his cousin challenge him for leadership, even though technically he could refuse. He sees no reason to change the way things are done, or bring his country out of isolation, even when his family and ex-girlfriend pressure him to do so. T’Challa has become comfortable with how things are. He is also steeped in respect for family; he is horrified to discover his father ‘betrayed’ and had his own brother murdered for his radical views, then abandoned his son to live alone in America rather than bringing him home. He constantly references the ways of their people (“waging war is never our way”) and uses it as justification to remain somewhat passive on a global scale, because he lacks the ability to see the big picture. Through his personal experiences, he witnesses what Killmonger has felt and experienced and uses that to change his ideas of what they can do as a nation; he opens them up to the rest of the world and begins sharing their resources. T’Challa also has an incredibly powerful Fe – he is openly emotional, easily touched by others’ suffering, and immediately thinks of how Erik must have felt, finding his father dead and being abandoned for so many years. He begs someone who has challenged him to a fight to the death to change his mind, and surrender, because ‘your people need you.’ He makes most of his decisions from a basis of ‘we’ – speaking collectively of those he serves. Others say he is a ‘good man, with a good heart.’ When Nakia suggests they should be doing more to help other nations and people, it makes him question whether their policy of isolation is right (“should we be helping them?”). T’Challa is compassionate and driven by his feelings; he can’t let Everett die “when it is in my power to save him,” and does not listen to his guard when she points out the potential rational consequences of exposing Everett to their technology. At first, T’Challa hides behind his ‘duty’ to his own countrymen, but also has a strong negative reaction to Killmonger wanting to cause chaos and anarchy, and rise up people to ‘murder their oppressors and their children’ (“It is not our way to be judge, jury, and executioner over people who are not our own; I am not the king of all, but of my people”). He often extends mercy to his enemies, even when it is unwise, and later, acknowledges that they have a larger responsibility to the people of the world (“We have let the fear of our discovery stop us from doing what is right. It is our cause, for all of us!”). He later rouses others to join a common cause, by saying, “The wise build bridges. We must find a way to look after one another as if we were a single tribe.”) When brought back to life, T’Challa convinces an old rival to join him for the greater good of all, but also points out that Erik will come for him next. He has a desperate need to understand the decisions his father made, and to know why he did not bring his nephew back to live among his family. T’Challa is not a visionary, but takes others’ desires, ideas, and views of the future and incorporates them into his own decisions about what to do (expand into the world, become known, and set an example to the world).

Enneagram: 1w9 sp/so

T’Challa is principled and always wants to do what is right; he is willing to accept his cousin’s challenge for the throne, because he feels that his father did the wrong thing when he murdered Erik’s father and left him alone in the world. He is willing to accept the judgment of others, and also inclined not to listen to others at times – he has no interest in expanding their borders or influence until he witnesses the suffering of others himself, and has thought it through and decided it is the right thing to do. Later, he chooses sides in the Civil War based on these rigid principles, and his ideas about who is ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ in the conflict between Captain America and Iron Man. He represses his anger, and even offers his cousin the chance to live (“we could still heal you”); but it takes him a long time to move out of his passivity into direct action – it has to come on behalf of his people, to stop Erik from doing terrible things, rather than out of a sense of generosity. He would rather keep his borders small, and remain unaffected by the suffering in the greater world, ignoring it and considering it not his problem.

Paid Request: Black Panther: Okoye [ESTJ 1w9]

Function Order: Te-Si-Ne-Fi

Okoye has risen to the position of a general ahead of other women in her ranks, because she is willing to put aside all emotions to do what is best for the country. She proves to be pragmatic and rational in all things; when her boyfriend asks her if she would kill him to protect the kingdom, she does not hesitate to say yes – and later almost has to make good on that, when they confront each other in mortal combat. She is against saving Everett’s life and bringing him back to their country, because up until now they have kept secret their advanced technology. She knows that “as a foreign operative,” he could expose them. When Erik defeats T’Challa in rightful combat and takes over the throne, she refuses to abdicate her position or abandon her post, claiming that she must serve the bloodline that sits on the throne, regardless of how she feels about him. She warns T’Challa not to let his emotions overcome him and “freeze up” when he sees his ex (like he always does), then makes fun of him when he does just that. Okoye is very traditional, respectful of the ways of their people, and does not want to change that even when it goes against her immediate emotional reaction. She is practical and hands on, confident in her trained fighting techniques, but also has a softer, more playful side; she loves to tease her king and interact with humor with his sister, but spends little time searching for motives beyond what is obvious. She warns T’Challa to consider the consequences of his actions, and make no rash judgments. Her feelings lag behind her; it’s only when Erik violates her beliefs that she turns against him and obeys her desire to be loyal to T’Challa.

Enneagram: 1w9 so/sp

Okoye puts her duty above all else, including her sentimental side; she has sworn to protect the throne and will do so, no matter who sits on it, because it is the right thing to do. She won’t allow sentiment to get in the way of her decisions, but also respects T’Challa for the choices he makes that are moral and just. She has no mercy against those who disrespect her king (“If he touches you again, I’ll impale him to the desk”), but also conducts herself appropriately at all times, showing the proper respect to the authorities, the traditions of their people, and to her position. She operates out of anger and pure instincts, but also can remain detached, and unaffected by outside forces. Okoye sees no reason to get upset most of the time, and maintains a state of calm, though she does like to tease people from time to time.

Blithe Spirit: Charles Condomine [INFP 1w9]

Function Order: Fi-Ne-Si-Te

Charles is something of an emotional wreck when we first meet him, since he his holed up in his writing apartment without an idea to call his own, moaning about being blocked and incapable of writing anything, even though he has promised to deliver a screenplay relatively soon, to help them out of a financial woe. In truth, he’s bemoaning the loss of his first wife, Elvira, who is on his mind often, since… well, to be honest, he hasn’t come up with a single good plot himself. He relied on her to give him all the excellent characters, the deep narratives, and the good plot twists, since he struggles to string ideas together coherently. However, persuaded to go out and about the town one evening, he watches a medium revealed as a fraud and has a brilliant idea – to invite her to the house for a séance, hoping for more inspiration. He has come up with a new angle for his script, his detective can solve a crime with the aid of spiritual forces at work! But it backfires and brings her back into the present, where his feelings for her start to form again… and later, wane as he finds her to be an inconvenience. Charles is forever remarking on how inappropriate and immoral her proposals are, while being sucked into them as his same old feelings emerge by being around her (Fi/Si). More and more, he seems to be incapable of moving on, and winds up falling into the same old routines with her, enjoying how she coaxes him out of his comfort zone, and … finding out things about their marriage, her infidelity, etc., that he would rather forget. As it turns out, he romanticized her, and failed to remember what a psycho she can actually be, and his own feelings do an about-face when he realizes how destructive and dangerously unhinged she is. He wavers between wanting to get rid of her, and pointing out that he wasn’t supposed to be a monk forever, people move on, so that’s what he did. He says he loves them both, but as his wives point out later, the only person he loves is himself. Charles winds up having an affair with his dead wife, while Ruth knows nothing about it, despite his own objections. But it’s his inferior Te that really gets him into trouble. Charles is just… blunt. He frankly tells his ex that she’s dead, hurting her feelings. He can be cross and petulant, bossy and angry. He tells his wife off for being indecent and orders her out of his sight, all the while forgetting there are other people present, and getting himself kicked off a movie lot for unintentionally offending the director, his father-in-law, his wife, and an actress. He continues to tell her off and even chase her around with a shovel, forgetting there are other people present, and that his actions will land him in the nuthouse.

Enneagram: 1w9 so/sp

Charles has a long of strong, moralistic opinions to unload on Elvira – when she says she might win him back, he points out that’s immoral, since he is now married to someone else. He tells her to stop behaving like a harlot and condemns her for being vain and self-obsessed. He tells her at a later date to stop being indecent, and that her behavior is not appropriate. His immediate reaction to anything she does is to get angry about it, and to tell her off, while not wanting to upset his other wife or hurt her feelings. But he’s a bit of a hypocrite, since despite all his objections, he winds up having sex with his wife’s ghost. In that way, his 9 wing merges into her and lowers his defenses. He also hates any kind of serious conflict and tries to make peace with his wives as best he can. When that fails, he avoids them. Charles also has something of a habit of laziness, which his first wife points out – he has become too comfortable in his bedroom slippers. And, Ruth also notices it, saying that he’s choosing creature comforts over writing, since he ought to get the good ideas down while they are fresh.

An Inspector Calls: Inspector Goole [INFJ 1w9]

Function Order: Ni-Fe-Ti-Se

SPOILERS. Inspector Goole shows up at the house under the pretext of asking questions of the family to ascertain their involvement in Eva’s life, but he actually knows all the answers to the questions before he even starts, and, as he tells them, he follows only one line of questioning at a time. He comes to warn the family ahead of time that if they do not change their approach to life and adopt a more humanistic mindset and morality, they will get a baptism of fire in the utter destruction of their family name. He comes to change their hearts and minds, foreseeing what is about to pass and intending to warn and challenge them, but also force them to admit to their callous and selfish behaviors. Though he seems immune to their protests and has no interest in their excuses, he shares the Fe belief at the end that “we don’t live alone, we are responsible for each other.” Humanity must care for and look after the weakest of its own, seeing every class as equal, in order to function and improve itself. He wants to change them, and for them never to forget their role in one woman’s downfall, since he can see the big picture of how each of their decisions impacted the overall picture of Eva’s life and led her on a downward spiral. He also comes to embarrass each of them in front of each other, and force them to confront their evil actions—to torment them on an emotional level, impact their feelings, and force them to change their ways through appealing to their deeper human nature and rubbing in how she died.

Enneagram: 1w9 so/sp

The inspector has a moralistic tone and a belief in doing his “duty.” He appears to be either a visitation of God, raining down condemnation and disapproval upon the selfishness of this particular family, or an avenging angel sent to make them pay for Eva’s crimes. He wants them to take responsibility for their wrong, hurtful choices, and to change their ways—or face the “baptism of fire” that awaits them in public opinion and through their family disgrace in their involvement with this young woman’s downfall. He can be quite cold, immune to their pleas for him to be more appropriate and/or leave (which are all born of selfishness), and forceful in his views, choosing to stay and insisting he isn’t going to leave until he has fulfilled his duty. He confronts each of them with their sins and doesn’t seem much ruffled by their emotional upsets, remaining distant and cool, idealistic and judgmental.

To Walk Invisible: Charlotte Bronte [INTJ 1w9]

Function Order: Ni-Te-Fi-Se

Charlotte develops a vision for herself and her sisters, her intention for them to all become published writers and novelists, and works toward it tirelessly. She places a great deal of emphasis on her own intellect and intellectualism, confessing frustration to her sister that it isn’t fair that women are so diminished in a man’s world, when their minds are as sharp as any man’s. She is quick to think of the future, when dealing with problems; she sees the trouble with having their work mixed up (she also doesn’t want any of them to take credit for one another’s published fiction) and wants to take decisive action to correct it. Charlotte is practical and down to earth, more so than her sisters; she puts aside writing for a long time, because it doesn’t seem like the “adult” thing to do. She believes they should publish a book of poetry together, and defy cultural norms, because together their work is substantial enough to make sales, and that they should assume male identities to better promote and sell their work. She wants to know why the world is how it is, why men get to do more important things, and often has very profound, critical insights to share about society (she says a woman is judged for writing a novel, where a man’s work is judged for itself). She is often detached, distant, and logical, but doesn’t really share her thoughts easily with others. Charlotte violates her sister’s privacy to read her poetry, and it makes her emotional because of its pure expression of feeling (she tells Emily it’s the most beautiful thing she’s ever read). She becomes very upset when a publisher believes she and Anne are the same person, and is determined to set him straight. Charlotte shows no real sensory impulses other than her spur of the moment decision to travel to London without any warning and introduce herself (and her sisters) to the publishers; in that moment, she decides to throw over their secret identities to set the record straight.

Enneagram: 1w9 sp/sx

Charlotte is withdrawn and proper, unafraid to voice her harsh opinions about her brother’s immoral behavior, but also not wanting to stir up trouble unnecessarily. She is somewhat straightforward and aggressive in stating her own opinions, but also does not want to draw Emily’s wrath down upon her. When the publisher mixes up their false names and wants to credit her work to her sister, she angrily goes to London to confront him and reveal her authorship (even though they had previously agreed not to do so). She writes Jane Eyre, which is all about a rigidly moralistic young woman resisting temptation, even in defiance of love, and holding herself to such a strong standard, she changes Rochester in the process. Charlotte both loves her brother and disapproves of his behavior. She doesn’t like to admit to it when she is wrong, and argues that Emily’s amazing poetry and how it would ‘lift’ their entire poetry book from mere drudgery to something amazing, makes her violation of Emily’s privacy all right.

Paid Request: Judgment at Nuremberg: Ernst Janning [ISTJ 1w9]

Functional Order: Si-Te-Fi-Ne

Ernst is a respected judge who spent most of his time and efforts before Hitler’s rise to power establishing laws, writing legal textbooks others across the world use, and writing up constitutions respected for their detailed explanations and clear processes. He was “dedicated to the cause of justice” and spent his entire career attempting to uphold it. He confesses that he was suckered into Nazism, thinking it would do some good in the world, but he was mistaken; he misjudged it, when one day he woke up to discover himself in the bowls of a massive, evil machine – that this was not just a “passing phase” in German history, but its defining moment. He says they knew bad things were happening, but not their extent, but that doesn’t excuse their actions. Ernst speaks up to defend himself, his attorney, and their actions not with excuses, but the explanation that a love of their country, a desire to come out of poverty, and a wish to feel proud of Germany once again motivated their decisions. He bucks his attorney’s demands they focus on the future, and instead allows himself to be punished for the past. He shows an immense amount of Fi, remaining silent in the courtroom until pushed too far by the suffering of a woman, asserting how different he is from his companions (“I am nothing like you,” he retorts against an unapologetic co-defendant), and feeling enormous remorse for his participation in such crimes, especially after he sees videos of the concentration camps. That changes his mind and makes him determined to speak up and take his punishment, even if it makes him unpopular with his co-defendants

Enneagram: 1w9 sp/so

Ernst sits through his trial, unwilling to speak up, defend himself, or talk to anyone, lost in a mental world of his own making – until his lawyer crosses the line and makes a witness cry when forcing her to relive one of his more notoriously cruel sentences, then he has an outburst and wants to confess. He admits to his wrongdoing and his remorse for it, testifies against his fellow judges, and says they should all be held accountable for their misdeeds, but also justifies why they did it, out of a love and passion for their country, which he claims is also his attorney’s reason for attempting to malign everyone who testifies against them. At the end of the film, he wishes to make sure Judge Dan knows he does not hold anything against him, and that he is sorry for his actions; he entrusts his case files to him, and hopes he knows that he has done the right thing, even though “it will not make you popular.” He respects the judgment, because in his mind, “it was just,” and the sentence worthy of their willingness to ignore the atrocities committed under Hitler and his commanders.

This character was typed for a reader, per their paid request.

Chernobyl: Ulana Khomyuk [ISTJ 1w9]

Function Order: Si-Te-Fi-Ne

“It’s all there. Every decision, every button push, every turn of a switch.”

Ulana quickly establishes herself as a woman of action. By her own admission, she “works too hard”, because Ulana is a realist and she knows that as a woman in a man’s world, she has to work ten times as hard to be taken seriously. She is diligent, meticulous, and extremely conscientious; however, as a perceiving dominant, she prefers to gather and compile information before leaping into decisive action. When the radiation alarm goes off at her office building in Minsk, she hurries to gather a fistful of particles and puts them through a mass spectrometer so that she can find out exactly what type of radioactive element they are dealing with, and when the meter tests positive for uranium 235, Ulana deduces that it’s nuclear reactor fuel, ergo, there must be a reactor leak somewhere in the immediate vicinity. Ulana prefers to use tried methods that are proven to work (Te) and first tries to act within the existing framework of rules to combat the problem she has discovered. She heads to the party headquarters in Minsk to “reason” with the smug party man in charge by simply outlining the problem and explaining why it is a problem, but she quickly gives up her attempts to reason with him and simply walks away without any fuss when he rejects her expert opinion. Unlike the scatterbrained Legasov, Ulana is meticulous about keeping records straight and chronicling information that might be useful at a later time. Ulana’s strong sensing preference allows her to quickly absorb and understand mechanics, and she has a better eye for practical engineering and three-dimensional map-building than Legasov. Ulana’s inferior Ne manifests in an occasional inability to “get out of the loop” and integrate fresh and unusual perspectives into her calculations. She spends endless hours going over the data from the explosion without making any headway. (“The numbers all say the same thing: that it’s impossible.”) She can sometimes be idealistic and naïve, and does not realize that Legasov knows more about the cause of the explosion than he’s letting on and is hiding things from her. Her preference for sensing also shows in her method of information-gathering; unlike an intuitive, she does not do well with second-hand information, so she conducts repeated interviews with the men who were there during the night of the explosion – the factual circumstances straight from the horse’s mouth.

Enneagram 1w9 sp/so

Ulana holds herself and her associates to an almost impossibly high standard both professionally and morally. The idea of giving up does not exist in her mind, and she continues to champion their cause when both Scherbina and Legasov (both fear-driven head types) express doubts about moving forward with the investigation.  She states the truth in that the testimony has to come from Valery Legasov because of the sway he holds in the scientific community; if she testifies, no one will listen. Ulana does not usually mince her words, and her general air is one of dryness. Her 9 wing sometimes manifests as passive-aggressive behavior and statements (monosyllabic answer to innocent questions and negative insinuations about other people’s intellect). Whilst not outright conflict-averse, she will not press Dyatlov for information when he tells her to f*ck off.

Die Hard: Hans Gruber [ENTJ 1w9]

Function Order: Te-Ni-Se-Fi

Hans believes in being efficient and making rational decisions, and has a good argument for every direction he gives. He argues that they need to stay focused, and pay attention to what they are doing, and that they can let the FBI “mess around” for hours and give them the time they need to get into the vault. He has planned this down to every detail and wants to be efficient. Hans goes about making systematic decisions, at first selecting the boss and then demanding he give them the key codes they need, then threatening other people in the department while his men drill through the vault. He urges his men to put aside their personal resentments against John McClane, seeing them as irrelevant even after John has killed several members of their crew. He has envisioned exactly what he wants and intends to see it through, refusing to be drawn off his game plan. He sometimes pieces together what is going on without being told, even though he cannot get a fix on who John is or what he wants (he does suspect accurately that he’s not a night guard, since he doesn’t fit the profile; he’s too efficient and proactive in causing them trouble). When John derails his plans, Hans is capable of adapting in the moment, even if he’s resentful of doing so; he goes up to the roof to check on the cut wires, is captured, and then impersonates an escaped employee, to trick John into trusting him. (Unfortunately for him, John sees through his ruse and gives him an unloaded weapon as a test.) He doesn’t mind shooting people in person, or doing any of the legwork required to keep them on track. Hans has somewhat of a dry sense of humor and a mild moralism to his statements, in which he accuses the company of being amoral and strip-mining. He ignores the feelings of his men and tells them to just buckle down and do their job, even after one of them’s brother is killed. He isn’t above threatening John’s wife and terrorizing her to get what he wants, but he also doesn’t torture people unnecessarily—just shoots them to make a point.

Enneagram: 1w2 so/sp

Hans starts off his search for Tagomi by listing off all the awful things his company has done to the planet and the people involved in all the places where he has “improved” the terrain through his building projects. He reminds his companions not to be “rude.” And he calmly, rationally handles problems as they arise, thinking fast on his feet and doing nothing that is not necessary, even though his aim is to steal from the company. He reminds them that he has planned everything down to the smallest possible detail, and that it needs to be accurate. Hans manages to keep his temper most of the time, although John causes him increasing frustration. He is surprisingly calm and level-headed through the “crisis” that John causes among his men, but also somewhat callous in his decision to shoot various people in the head.

Paid Request: The Man in the Iron Mask: Aramis [INFJ 1w9]

Function Order: Ni-Fe-Ti-Se

Aramis is far more interested in the implications of things than their direct application; he spends a lot of time in thought and prayer, but also controls an elite sect of Jesuits whose sole purpose is to discern a way to change the future of France by replacing the king with his twin brother, Philipe. Where his friends attack d’Artangan for being so loyal to Louis, Aramis engages him in a theological discussion in an attempt to understand where he is coming from (Ni/Ti). He speaks in high abstractions and metaphorical language a great deal (“Hell may be our destination, but not on this trip,” “Your heart carries a secret weight and it hurts you to carry it alone,” “I am willing to give your life and my soul,” “This is everything we once were… and may be again!” etc). He gets annoyed with Aramis claiming his plan is unreasonable, because “I have considered everything!” He complains that someone is “seeking facts, when you should be seeking the truth.” Aramis saved their old uniforms so they could “wear them in death… and so we shall!” He also knows Porthos means it in his threat to commit suicide and saws the beam he assumes his friend will use, causing the barn to collapse when he tries (he shrugs and says he’s a priest, not an architect). Aramis has spent years cultivating this scheme to rescue Philipe, train him up, and replace him with Louis at a public event, and decides at last that it is “time” – because Porthos and Athos are all on the same emotional wavelength as he is, intolerant of a regime of public abuse and personal cruelties. Aramis tries to bring them together in this plan and motivate even d’Artangan to act as part of the group, but is also respectful of his need to do what he sees as right. He uses inclusive language to persuade them to join him (“We fought injustice and crime together.” “All for one, and one for all.”). He tries to convince d’Artangan to open up emotionally to him, and talk about what is bothering him. Aramis also believes they can use the “reverence” the new Musketeers have against them to their advantage (and he’s right). He is thoughtful, studied, and highly intellectual, but also firm in what he believes they must do, and able to ignore complaints that he is not being reasonable and they cannot do all of this in a few weeks. Aramis shows almost no inferior Se, except in his admission that he was not always a good priest in his youth, prone to over-indulgence and sinful behaviors. He becomes more willing to take risks when he realizes they must bring their plans forward and act at once, or they may never get another chance. Aramis fights when he has to, but prefers mainly to work behind the scenes of things.

Enneagram: 1w2 so/sp

Aramis notices how Louis is a cruel man and judges him according to his behaviors, using his actions against Raoul as a catalyst to convince Athos and Porthos to join his cause. He finds it hard to accept that his friend d’Artangan chooses to still serve such a corrupt and vile king, which makes him see his decision to remove him as something he is doing for the greater good of the citizens of France. He is confident in his actions, believes himself to be intelligent, and agrees that he is far holier than any of his friends. Though, he is not without his spurts of anger, as observed when he starts a fight with Porthos after his friend won’t leave him alone to pray. Aramis prides himself on how he has created a peaceful revolution, “without blood or even treason,” because Philipe is also the son of a king! He has served in a professional capacity to Louis for many years, never giving him any reason to suspect that Aramis is working behind the scenes against him, cultivating an entire movement to take him down. Aramis would rather persuade others to join his cause than cause friction among them, and asks his friends to please calm down and not quarrel, but to focus on the task at hand.

This character was typed for a reader, per their paid request.

Paid Request: The Crucible: Elizabeth Proctor [ISTJ 1w9]

Functional Order: Si-Te-Fi-Ne

Elizabeth focuses on her duty of being a good Christian wife, mother, and worker, but also wants her husband to live up to his greater potential as a “good man.” She does not like his affair and seeks to punish him for it through silent treatment and cool indifference, even though he has confessed to her; she holds him up against what he ‘should be,’ according to their shared beliefs (their Puritan faith), but also does not push him to change himself except in her silence. She is more detailed than him and more attentive to their beliefs, and knows the Commandments where he has forgotten a few. She does her duty by him by tending the house and raising his children well, and is far more sensible than a lot of their neighbors—less inclined to hysterics, and more inclined to view Abigail through her personal, subjective knowledge of her as a “harlot” and a “troublemaker.” Elizabeth does not like being lied to, and has a reputation for being honest (her husband says she never lied a day in her life). She confesses late in the story that she never knew how to “say my love” for John, and admits that it was a “cold house I kept,” one of duty but not overt affection. She blamed herself for his “lechery,” because she never saw herself as anything other than “plain and poorly.” Elizabeth does not attempt to influence her husband in any direction at the end of his life – even though telling him to sign a lie would free them both, she is so moved and appreciative of his sudden need to “do the right thing” that she leaves the decision entirely up to him, as her husband and the head of the household. She says now that he has his goodness, God forbid she take it from him. She also tells him that he needs to forgive himself for his affair, since it was never about her forgiveness, but his inability to live with having violated his own beliefs. She does not show much intuition, except in her hope that her husband can become a better man, and in her opinion of Abigail (“that girl is murder!”).

Enneagram: 1w9 sp/so

Elizabeth cares more about the soul than the earthly body, as is shown in her high-minded idealism and the fact that she has not forgiven her husband for being human. She wants him to be perfect, to live up to a higher ideal, to live according to their religious beliefs, and celebrates when he does so, even if it means his death, because at least he goes to heaven a martyr to something worthwhile, to his principles, rather than taking a cowardly road (in her mind) and saving his life at the cost of his soul. He accuses her several times of being “unforgiving,” despite his repentance and sorrow for his actions, but it’s more that she does not know how to tell him he is forgiven, and does not like conflict, so puts on a cool exterior. In the end, she is vindicated in the belief that his time in prison has transformed his soul.

This character was typed for a reader, per their paid request.

Anna Karenina: Alexei Karenin [ISTJ 1w9]

Function Order: Si-Te-Fi-Ne

Alexei believes in maintaining his traditional “role” as a husband and ensuring his wife does as well. He did everything expected of him—met and married a woman to give him children, provides for her, and expects her to continue to act as his wife even when she becomes emotionally involved with another man. In the novel and in other adaptations of the story, he agrees to let them see each other, provided she will still sleep with him as usual (per what a wife’s traditional role is), which she finds intolerable. Even though he hates her for a time, he refuses to let her go and divorce her, believing eventually her lover will tire of her, abandon her, and wanting to provide for her if and when that happens—again, because it’s what husbands do. He holds to the establishment, both as a politician and an individual. In his private life, he is traditional and detailed. He is more sensible and grounded than his wife, and has no interest in her fantasies or desire to be involved in the lives of others. Alexei holds grudges for a long time, until something changes his mind. He’s aware of social rules and desires to protect those he loves from them (or cause them to fall beneath them, whichever suits his situation most). He likes to get things done. Alexei will choose a course of action and pursue it. He’s methodical in his job and prefers to follow a rational line of thought. The established methods and religious principles are good enough for him – he sees no reason to challenge them. He is logical to what Anna considers to be a fault – conscious of what his divorce will do for her, he continues to keep her as his wife out of concern that she will be destitute if her lover abandons her. His emotions are usually held in restraint, but when wronged, Alexei becomes personally insulted and angered. He lashes out in anger when he can’t take her defiance anymore, but also believes it is his personal responsibility to look not only after her person, but also her soul. Alexei finds it in himself to forgive her all her sins against him, and her lover as well. It doesn’t take him long to discern what is truly going on around him – he sees quickly that Anna is infatuated with Vronsky and suspects they are lovers. He notices their unspoken exchanges and the shift in tension whenever he enters the room, but he refuses to take their love seriously, instead focusing on his own determination to “protect” her from herself, thus unconsciously thwarting Anna’s need for security in her relationships by preventing their marriage. In the book, he becomes sucked into a religious cult out of his need to find something deeper, which shows his lack of discernment (inferior Ne).

Enneagram: 1w9 sp/so

Karenin is focused on doing the “right” and “dutiful” thing to such an extent that his passionate, emotional wife finds him cold. He always wants to do what is right by her, although he also simmers with a barely-repressed anger at times. At the end of the story, he even agrees to raise her bastard child because it is his “duty.” In so doing, he denies the parentage of the child’s actual father, Vronsky. Though he does not want to forgive her, Karenin does so because it’s the appropriate, moral response to her asking him for forgiveness (a 1 “reaction formation” response, which is to do the opposite of what one feels because it is “right”). He focuses on keeping a balance between his emotions and his physical needs, in working hard but not being emotionally expressive. He cares about being a competent politician and focuses most of his energy there – he  cannot understand why his wife would have “other” needs when he provides a stable home environment for her. He hates conflict of any kind and is willing to tolerate their immoral behavior provided it does not shame them in public or draw attention to their marital problems.

Pretty Woman: Edward Lewis [ENTJ 1w9]

Function Order: Te-Ni-Se-Fi

Edward is a workaholic who can’t take time off even to spend with a beautiful woman. His previous relationships have left him, after claiming they spent more time with his secretary than him (he wonders if this is true, but does nothing about it or to prevent them from leaving). He’s in the business of taking corporations and selling them off piecemeal, or as he tells Viv, “screwing people for money.” He doesn’t spend much time thinking about how this impacts them on an emotional level until after spending more time with Vivien. Her love of life, vivacious energy, and enjoyment of people cause him to start wondering about his life choices. But prior to that, he is all about the bottom line. He hires her for the night and negotiates a fair price, then hires her for the week and negotiates a decent price. When she teasingly drops the hint that she’ll be so wonderful, he never wants her to leave, he reminds her that “this is business.” The implication being, at the end of the week, we’re done. He is something of a visionary who admits that very few people surprise him, but Vivien does. He can see potential in her where others might not, which makes him keep her around, both for enjoyment of her company, usefulness, and because she’s unusual and appeals to his sense of wonder. Edward is a bit impulsive, in that he grabs his friend’s car and drives off in it, but has no idea how to shift gears and is intimidated by all its horsepower. He also keeps her around, hiring her full-time, decking her out in beautiful clothes, and spending money easily on room service, without thinking about how it might hurt his reputation if it becomes public. Finding his partner trying to assault her causes him to bodily react and throw him out. Like a lot of ENTJs, Edward underestimates his own feelings. He assumes he cares less for Vivien than he does, only to go running after her at the end of the week, faced with never seeing her again, and make a sappy declaration of love on her balcony.

Enneagram: 1w9 sp/so

Edward has a weird relationship with his ethics. He is firm and dogmatic, he has no problem laying down boundaries and asserting himself, but he also isn’t quite sure why he brought her up to his room and at first, resists her advances. He asks her to dress more appropriately when going up to the hotel, since he’s worried about how it might look, and he doesn’t like it much when she reveals herself frankly as a prostitute to a couple of haughty bystanders. Being around her makes him start to question his own motivation and get more in touch with doing the right thing (being sympathetic to people’s needs, and willing to work within their companies instead of chopping them up and selling them off) than his usual detached method of non-emotional engagement. Others comment on how cold and distant he can be, since his 9 wing hates conflict of any kind. He will simply walk out of the room and/or try to appease someone if he must.

Austenland: Henry Nobley [ISTJ 1w9]

Function Order: Si-Te-Fi-Ne

Henry is a history professor who decided to spend a week at his aunt’s estate because she needed the help while one of her actors had gone away, but he admittedly finds the entire thing stupid. People dressing up, pretending to fall in love, and being so trite are beneath him, so he spends the vast amount of his time reading books and ignoring people. He can be straightforward and somewhat blunt, refusing to participate if he thinks things are too ridiculous, and unable to act differently from how he feels. In truth, he cannot figure out how to convince Jane of the strength of his true feelings for her until he points out the facts—both of them are rubbish at acting, so it’s obviously true that they genuinely feel something for each other. He looks after her and uses rational methods to solve her problem; when she says she cannot ride astride on a horse thanks to her “getup,” he just rips the skirt so she can throw her other leg over the horse. He likes Jane because she is refreshingly authentic and true to herself, and dares to be unconventional and live according to how she feels. But the strength of his own feelings for her surprises him, and only comes out under pressure, when he becomes angry about how others are treating her.

Enneagram: 1w9 sp/so

Henry is “rigid and proper,” disapproving and concerned with appropriate behavior. He doesn’t like it that his aunt’s husband tries to hit on Jane and is pleased that she dumped him on his posh backside. He doesn’t like to demean himself by acting insensible among the others or faking having a good time. He disapproves of the stable boy “leaving Jane” alone in a thunderstorm, with the implication that he dislikes his behavior. Henry dislikes the fake “falling in love” going on around him, and doesn’t want to participate in it. He shows disapproval around the pool when the other guys are going on about the ladies and what fun it is to manipulate them. Though somewhat stern and condescending of the atmosphere at first, Henry also admits that he enjoyed it as a “return to a simpler and more peaceful time.” He likes comfort and pleasantness and to avoid conflict.