Beautiful Creatures: Lena Duchannes [ISFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Lena is intensely emotional but also extremely private with her feelings. She goes away to be alone after traumatic events (once she explodes the windows in the classroom, Lena retreats to the garden to sort through her emotions). She has no problem shutting Ethan out while she comes to terms with her future fate, deciding for him that it would be best they aren’t together (she won’t permit him to die, so she must give him up). Lena finds it difficult to separate her actions from her emotions; her love for Ethan ultimately decides her choice. She is blunt and refuses to do anything she doesn’t want to do – when her uncle asks her to play the piano for Ethan, she says it’s the wrong century for that; when he asks her to get tea for them, she says that’s also the wrong century. Lena finds it hard not to be open about her true self; she hates hiding the fact that she is a Caster. She is objective and opportunistic. Lena has been in a dozen different schools and adapted to many new environments. She is interested in aesthetics, with a unique clothing style. She decorates her room with invisible poetry and loves to just be with Ethan, hanging out on the back of his car, going to movies, kissing, and discussing their futures (even though she doesn’t feel she has one). Lena doesn’t mind being physical with Ethan and is good at adapting to her environment and using it defensively (saving Ethan from the spell in the garden, fighting off another Dark Caster). She is quick to act (her casting of a spell over Ethan’s home saves his life). Her fixation on the future is negative, and based on the single outcome Lena feels is inevitable: fear that she will go dark and lose herself. No other possibilities enter her mind; Lena cannot see a way around the single truth that female Casters are not free to choose their own destinies. She is so focused on a future event (her 16th birthday) that Lena sometimes has trouble living in the present – but when the time comes, she finds inner strength to develop a new vision for the future not only of herself, but Casters in general. Creative thinking is not her forte; Lena believes what the books tell her, that there is no way out of this mess, so she tries to surrender to it. She acts defensively in tough situations. Her harsh logical judgments, opinions, and statements turn up under stress. Lena is rude to Ethan on their first several meetings, and dismissive of him in order to protect her emotions. Later, she makes a logical, tactical decision to protect him from harm by causing him to forget their romance.

Enneagram: 4w5 sp/so

Lena feels different from other people, and is envious of how easily Ethan connects. She says he doesn’t understand what it’s like to grow up unwanted and different, shuffled around to various schools, to have your future taken away from you, etc. She refuses to do anything unless she feels like doing it, and at one point gets upset and starts crying when Ethan accuses her of being moody and acting like a bitch (she’s mad at him, so she makes a little rain cloud over his head so it will drench him). She wallows in her feelings of being different and feels frustrated but also incapable of doing anything about her future; she assumes she can’t be fixed, that the situation is going to turn out badly, etc. Rather than connect to Ethan at first, she pulls away from him, rebuffing his advances and demanding he leave her alone. She reads to avoid the outer world, and is blunt, sometimes harsh, and thinks little of other people – seeing them as mundane and not worth knowing, thus creating further self-isolation. She comes into her power once she realizes she has control over her own life, and that she can make her own decisions – taking charge of her life rather than avoiding it.

Sweeney Todd: Benjamin Barker / Sweeney Todd [ISFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Todd is utterly consumed with his emotions and the rage he feels toward those who wronged him and led to his imprisonment and his wife’s death; he is so ruled by these feelings, he fails to notice or read the people around him who wish to manipulate him for their own advantage (Mrs. Lovett). His lack of a moral center beyond his own sharp judgments give him free license to murder people, because in his mind, none of them deserve the right to live. He expresses severe subjective judgments upon the city as he returns to it, and only spares those he either likes, or who appeal to his more merciful nature – or sometimes, such as in Mrs. Lovett’s case, who give him rational reasons to keep them around (she says they need the boy, someone to do the fetching and carrying). Once he lands his hands on his old razors, Todd wants to slice his enemy’s throat open… and practices on anyone who enters his shop. This brutal, barbaric, and bloody practice could be discovered at any moment if someone walked through the door at the wrong time – but Todd doesn’t worry about that, since he feels confident in dealing with things in the sensory world without much warning; when someone threatens to blackmail and expose him, he bashes his head in with a kettle, throws his body in a trunk, and decides to dump it into the meat grinder. Todd throws Mrs. Lovett into an open oven and lets her burn to death, when he realizes she lied to him. He is impatient and erratic. Mrs. Lovett has to convince him that “good things come to people who wait,” since he’s already angry about the judge not having come for his shave two days into the week. His vision of defeating his enemy blinds him to drawing intuitive conclusions; he never once suspects his wife survived, nor that Mrs. Lovett has misled him, nor that the old woman is his wife! He’s too fixated on killing his enemy … and almost destroys his own daughter in the process! His inferior Te shows in his brutal desire to ‘get his revenge done,’ without ever stopping to question anything around him. He also lets Mrs. Lovett do a lot of thinking for him (what to do with the bodies; why let good meat go to waste?).

Enneagram: 4w5 sx/sp

Todd is the embodiment of an unhealthy 4’s mentality that you never forget, forgive, or get over the things that traumatized you about the past. Even though he has sailed the world and seen its wonders, he could not enjoy any of them because he was wallowing in hatred, anger, and resentment toward the man who robbed him of his “naïve” existence within a happy little family. Rather than accept what happened to him and move on, Todd allows it to turn him toward bitterness and violence. Every waking moment, he thinks about the wrongs done to him and covets the desire to avenge them by killing the two men responsible for these crimes. He sings about his hatred for London as a cesspool “full of people who are full of shit,” and decides to kill as many of them as possible while he waits for his chance to get the judge. Even when Anthony falls in love with is daughter, and comes up with a scheme to free her from the judge’s clutches, Todd doesn’t see this as a chance at redemption – rather, he mourns the daughter he will never see and uses her to get to the judge. He has a deep, melancholy nature – eve in Mrs. Lovett’s fantasy about their future together, she paints him as moping in corners and looking downtrodden, rather than joyously participating in their lives together. Todd wavers between intense emotions and intense detachment. He cares nothing for the innocent men whose throats he cuts, and instead figures out how to help Mrs. Lovett make a profit off them. He wallows in his own pain, while ignoring everyone else’s. He also has some twisted ideas about life, manifested through his many songs which take a dark turn. Once he finds out Mrs. Lovett betrayed him, he turns on her, then cradles his dead wife in his arms and gives himself up to death.

The Vampire Diaries: Jeremy Gilbert [ISFP 4w5]

Functional Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Jeremy has trouble at first with his girlfriend, because in his opinion, she lets Tyler treat her like “crap” – he asserts time and again that she ought to be true to herself and not need other people’s approval to be content; he tends to be blunt and open with his feelings, but also withdrawn and private (he closes out Elena and his aunt, Jenna, when he’s going through anguish after a death). He tends to prioritize his own emotional needs and desires above others – such as when he uses another girl to gain information about vampires, intending to die and become one to be with Vicky, leaving the new girl in the lurch. He lives in the moment. He’s an artist who loves to translate what he sees into his own unique style. He has trouble with over-indulgence in drugs and alcohol, but less so than Vicky; he even complains that “all we ever do is get high all the time.” Jeremy wants more out of life than that. Whatever feeling he’s having, clouds his entire life – he’s stuck there, wallowing in it, unable to see a way out, or convinced he must do a single thing (like become a vampire) to survive. He has cutting insights into other people and intuitive hunches that Elena is keeping things from him. His inferior Te tends to be frank, honestly assessing situations and delivering zingers when he’s upset, but Jeremy slacks off in school, does not see the point of studying, and has no ambition.

Enneagram: 4w5 sx/sp

Jeremy is something of an emo stereotype; he sees no reason to be like anyone else and actively resists them. He judges his girlfriend harshly for wanting to be liked or admired by other people, and compromising herself to do it. He doesn’t bother to make friends with anyone he doesn’t like, and looks down on them all as shallow and uninteresting. Jeremy doesn’t easily move on from his pain, but dwells in it, broods about it, and draws dark art about it. He’s willing to become a vampire just to connect, and deeply hurt when he discovers he’s being used by a vampire to gain more information. He is affronted to realize Elena had his memories taken away from him. He’s isolated, withdrawn, and has a dark sense of aesthetics. He even admits that he finds drinking and getting high to be wasteful of his time and boring, inferring that he wishes they had something deeper and more meaningful to do.

Clash/Wrath of the Titans: Hades [INFJ 4w5]

Function Order: Ni-Fe-Ti-Se

Hades is a master manipulator who much prefers to do things from the shadows than engage in hand-to-hand combat. Though bitter about his imprisonment in hell, in comparison to the heavens and the sea – the realms of his brothers – he watches and waits for his chance to strike at Zeus. When the humans tear down the statue of Zeus above their harbor, Hades appears to them, destroys them all, and sinks Perseus’ boat. He then persuades Zeus to let him do more damage, by convincing his brother the humans will learn respect for the gods once more. In reality, Hades intends to arouse their fear; fear feeds him power, not the other gods. When it becomes clear Perseus intends to thwart his intentions and kill his kraken, Hades convinces a king punished by the gods to do his will and kill Perseus. He uses cruel, manipulative words to do this (you failed to kill this child of Zeus, so you murdered your wife for no reason; but here’s your chance to even the score). In the second film, Hades kidnaps and imprisons Zeus to drain his power to fuel their father’s restoration, but he also finds it hard to watch Zeus being abused by his son and puts a stop to it. He can’t stand by and watch him beaten mercilessly. Hades makes many of his decisions from an emotional place—revenge, wrath, and also forgiveness. When Zeus asks him for forgiveness, Hades gives it to him—and immediately switches sides. He gives his brother enough life force to save him (temporarily) so they can fight for the very humans he wanted to destroy a few years earlier. He makes impulsive decisions under stress, including his battle tactics.

Enneagram: 4w5 sp/sx

Hades suffers from a crippling envy and resentment toward his brother for possessing what he cannot have—Zeus tricked him and banished him to the underworld, while he rules on Olympus, so Hades decides to do everything in his power to get back at him. He makes all his decisions from his emotions—his resentment, and later, his acceptance of Zeus asking forgiveness and begging Hades to forgive him. He has stewed in his own juices for centuries, and gleefully takes the chance to get back at Zeus by stealing his prayers away from him. Darkly morbid, negative, and even cruel, Hades thinks up nasty punishments for the humans, including unleashing his kraken and demanding they sacrifice their princess to it. But he also had a lot of fearful motivations – once he realizes what he’s done in releasing their father from his centuries-old imprisonment, fearful for his life, he reunites with Zeus and fights alongside him to defeat him.

To Walk Invisible: Emily Bronte [INFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Ne-Si-Te

Emily spends much of her time writing intense poetry, which she doesn’t want to share with other people, because in her mind, that cheapens the emotions of it. She gets into a furious argument with Charlotte when Charlotte invades her privacy and reads her poems without permission. She doesn’t at first want to contribute to her siblings’ book of poetry, since she sees that as trite. Whenever she’s truly upset, she forbids others from speaking to her while she processes her emotions. Even though she can be furious at Branwell much of the time, Emily is also the first one to offer him help on his worst days. Her poems are full of rich, raw metaphors and broad connections. She retains a sense of dreaminess and a rich connection to nature and her own imagination. She contributed much to their stories as children, and like Anne, continues to write about their invisible world as an adult. She’s most excited when sharing with Anne an “idea” she heard about, a real event which she bases Wuthering Heights on, right down to the major characters. She draws much literary inspiration from her own life, using Branwell to influence aspects of Heathcliffe’s nature. Emily takes daily walks with the dogs, does most of the housekeeping and cooking for the family – and seems to enjoy it. She’s fairly content to remain at home. Emily is sharp-tongued and inclined to put people in their place whenever she’s upset, sometimes to the extent of “laying down ground rules” (“You don’t speak to me, you don’t address me, you don’t speak of me!”); she rarely does anything she doesn’t want to do, even when it causes discord among her sisters. Emily is extremely hard-working, and finishes what she starts.

Enneagram: 4w5 sx/sp

Emily writes extremely dark things and loves to dwell on them (Wuthering Heights is considered risqué for the period, because it revolves around morbid themes and/or a man digging up the dead woman he loves to “embrace” her … or maybe do more than that). She admits that she loves dark, tragic, sinister things and feels a kind of thrill at the idea of evil. She refuses to share her poetry easily, is easily offended by her sister poking around in her room (and angrily confronts them all, demanding to know who did it), and also refuses to reveal her pen name when the others want to do so, because “your writing has naught to do with me!” She won’t go to London with them and clear up the mess of the publisher putting the wrong name on the manuscript. In this way, Emily can be self-absorbed and temperamental, only concerned with her own feelings and inconsiderate of her siblings, prioritizing her own self above their needs (they want her support, she refuses and won’t give it). She forms a lot of harsh judgments about people, looking down on them for their subpar material, but is also secretive, reclusive, and withdrawn.

Sunshine Cleaning: Norah [ISFP 7w6]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Norah has kept feelings about her mother’s suicide locked away in her head for a long, long time, and they have somewhat derailed her life—she is quick to stomp out of a job when she’s fired for dropping a tray (after tripping), but she rarely showed up on time in the first place, preferring to hang out with her friends, do drugs, and sometimes drink and sleep in rather than go to work. When her sister starts a business in which they clean up dead people’s messes for a living, Norah initially doesn’t want to do it, then starts having feelings about the environment she’s in. Finding photos of an older woman and her daughter makes Norah wonder if the woman has loved ones, and if they know she’s dead. Against her sister’s advice, she finds the woman’s daughter and makes friends with her, because she wants to give her the photos but doesn’t know how to not be awkward about it. When it finally happens, it goes badly and Norah gets upset, because she didn’t know how to separate her own feelings from what happened (“I wish I had my mom…” so the assumption is, this woman may wish she knew about hers). Norah takes her friend “tresling,” where you stand on a crossbeam under the railroad tracks when a train rushes past, since it’s the “ultimate thrill.” She also lights a candle to clean the smell out of a dead person’s house and, in chasing a kitten outside, accidentally sets the place on fire. She tells her nephew scary stories to thrill him with, and ignores the fact that his mother told her not to, because it gives him nightmares. Norah takes a friend to a house party, where all the people there want to do is get drunk and make out. She ends the film by going on a road trip with her cat. She has sought meaning all her life, searching for it in temporary distractions and pleasures, but also wanting to know why her mother abandoned her and what it means to her identity. Norah shows a lot of inferior Te. She believes her accidental setting of the house on fire proves how unequipped she is to deal with the real world, and sees herself as inept. She angrily storms off and leaves her sister to deal with a poop-soaked mattress after her sister laughs at her for falling on it.

Enneagram: 7w6 sp/sx

Norah hasn’t been the same since her mother died, and she’s allowed that experience to Norah has been running away from things her entire life, through distractions; she is somewhat irresponsible and cannot hold down a job, because she gets bored. She doesn’t want to do hard work, and feels like a “screw up” when she makes a mistake and burns down a client’s home (while she’s making sure a kitten is all right and doesn’t get lost). She overdoes it on drinking and thrills, going up on the trestle to feel the rain roar past, rather than sit with and deal with the pain of her mom’s death (she half-sobs about it, but also loves the thrill of being up there, inches from death). Whenever she makes a mistake, she makes excuses and/or starts to beat herself up for it (disintegrating temporarily into 1 “I am a bad person” self-accusations). At the end of the movie, she goes on a road trip with her new kitten just to avoid everything she’s left behind and “get away.” Her 6 wing is fun and family-minded, but also insecure. She doesn’t want to do things on her own if they are hard.

Bumblebee: Charlie [ISFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Charlie works on the car her dad loved so much, in an effort to connect to him and let him “hear me” (if she can get it started), but also to work through her feelings. Her mother has remarried and moved on, but Charlie cannot. She quickly identifies with and befriends Bumblebee, the Transformer she finds hiding in her uncle’s service garage. She gives him a human-like personality, insists that he is “not just a machine,” fights for his right to be himself, and even takes his rejection of her musical choices in stride. She’s so wrapped up in her feelings at first, she fails to notice the boy next door likes her, and even at the end, she’s not quite ready to hold his hand. It has taken her several years to be able to talk about her dad dying of a heart attack, and how upset it made her, and she only confides in Bumblebee because he seems to understand and empathize with her. Charlie is very physical, always looking for things to do (fixing cars, working in a busy carnival, chasing down her mother and pretending to care about the family dog, driving with “no hands” and thinking it’s awesomely fun when Bumblebee outruns the cops after they’re almost caught for speeding, enjoying standing on the seat while joyriding, and turning off the power during the Transformers fight, then jumping into the flooded pathway to make sure Bumble is all right after his trouncing). She shows flits of intuition, such as when she finally figures out why Bumble is playing with the radio (“you’re trying to talk, aren’t you?”). And she can be quite blunt under stress, such as when she yells at Bumble after he has trashed their home while being told to stay home and hide today.

Enneagram: 4w5 sp/sx

Charlie has not moved on from her father’s death, but has allowed it to take over her life. She gave up swimming because it triggers her into having memories of his heart attack. Her new stepdad annoys her by complaining that she never smiles and tries to get anyone to like her, going so far as to give her a self-help book for her birthday. Charlie is caught up in her own pain enough to not notice a boy trying to get her attention. She identifies with Bumblebee because they are both broken – him with his vocal cords gone and her with her dad being gone. She learns through the story to face up to her loss, accept it, and begin to heal as she moves forward in her life. Her 5 wing is introverted and withdrawn, spends most of its time encouraging her to stay away from other people and not create dependencies, and is somewhat afraid. She doesn’t want Bumble to get caught or reveal himself and wind up being taken away from her, so she shows flits of cautiousness.

Little Fires Everywhere: Mia Warren [ISFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Mia relates everything back to herself, and her feelings, when making major decisions—she decides to side with Bebe Chow at work, in her desire to find and recover her daughter, because Mia herself could not give up her child despite being a surrogate mother. She decided that Pearl ‘belonged’ to her, because she ‘came out of my own body,’ and that defines motherhood to her: if she is yours, if you gave birth to her, then she belongs to you, regardless of extenuating circumstances. Even though she is living in Elena Richardson’s rental, and working for her in her home, Mia risks everything to sell a photograph of herself and get a lawyer to fight against Elena’s husband in court. Her daughter says she wishes Mia could make choices about her, once in awhile, rather than just thinking about herself all the time. She also reacts heavily in the moment, and lives entirely there without thinking as much about how things can spiral out and influence other things in her life. Mia has a great deal of casual sex, and her daughter says that Mia says it ‘can happen at any time, with anyone.’ She is a photographer and artist who just packs up and moves whenever she gets tired of a place, who won’t sell various pieces of art because they are too deeply personal to her, who had a hard time paying tuition in college because she refused to go to a trade school (being an artist is who I am!). She is opportunistic, sneaking around in Elena’s house and using what she finds out about them to help Bebe, but also risking herself in the process. She never imagines Elena, being a reporter, will dig up her past and use it against her in court, and deliberates on whether she can testify to Bebe’s character at the risk of exposing herself, but chooses to do it anyway. She rushes off to tell Bebe about finding her daughter, only to have her turn around and rush into the middle of the child’s birthday party—and supports her in this, not thinking how it could get them kicked out of their home and/or displease their landlord.

Enneagram: 4w5 sp/sx

Mia at her best wants other people to be able to live the lives they choose and be completely true to themselves (allowing her to connect to Izzy and help her through a hard time) and at her worst is self-absorbed and does whatever she wants, without thinking about how she is hurting other people. She becomes angry and defensive when her daughter accuses her of only thinking about herself, but makes no true attempt to win her over or do anything but control her. She makes emotional decisions, based out of an internal sense of what she believes, often hurting other people in the process—but she thinks she is trying to do good. She can be cold and critical when tearing people down, such as when she rakes Lexie over the coals for using Pearl’s name at the abortion clinic, rather than emotionally supporting her by telling her she did the ‘right’ thing. She has a lot of rules in her life that alienates her from other people, including her own daughter; she won’t even allow her to come into the studio at times. Mia is so afraid of exposure, she won’t tell anyone anything about her, she won’t stay in one place, and she refuses to join in on anything. Mia does not want to be beholding to anyone, tied down, or dependent; she is super secretive, withdrawn, and distant from strangers out of fear. But she can be confrontational when she thinks she is right, even if it costs her.

Little Fires Everywhere: Izzy Richardson [ISFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Izzy’s entire arc is about her fierce need to be true to who she is, and not conform to anyone else’s standards of behavior. She resists her mother’s attempts to convince her to be appropriate through minor acts of rebellion, such as refusing to wear a certain outfit in the family Christmas portraits and then, when forced to do so, discreetly flipping people off with one hand. She doesn’t want to conform, so she acts out musically, wears the wrong outfit on purpose, and clashes mightily with her Fe-dom mother’s desire for her to behave in a certain way. Instead, she gravitates toward Mia, who is another IFP who shares her desire to be individualistic and self-express. Izzy is an artist who dabbles in different mediums, who is excited to get her hands into new projects, who cuts up and rearranges magazine pictures, and who is also a fire bug. She often starts fires for the pure joy of watching them burn. When she feels she isn’t being respected at home, she tries to run away and later on, succeeds in hitting the road with only her backpack and her attitude of survival to ensure she has a secure future. She can be confrontational and aggressive under pressure (low Te) but is also extremely private about her feelings—she doesn’t want anyone to know her struggles with bullies at school due to being gay, and feels deeply hurt and resentful that her girlfriend “outed” her to save her own reputation. She isn’t always aware of other’s feelings, so is surprised and hurt when Mia doesn’t want anything to do with her, after accusing her of being “invasive” and because of her family’s behaviors—that has nothing to do with Izzy, so she rejects it and tries to make amends.

Enneagram: 4w5 sx/sp

Izzy is all about presenting herself as a certain kind of person, who is “anti-everything.” Whatever other people are doing, she does the opposite. However they think, she thinks the opposite. However they dress, she wants to dress the opposite. She’s busy making herself out to be not like everyone else, and in the process, inflating her suffering. She feels  things deeply, but cannot just brush them aside and move on—she dwells in how different she is, how she doesn’t fit in her family, how she was born into the wrong life, because nothing about her is anything like the “picture perfect” world her mother wants to live in. Rather than try and “fit” like her sister, Izzy goes the opposite way, throwing herself into her art, pushing away everyone at school, and only finding solace in Mia, who is her inspiration and a source of comfort to her, because Mia lets her be true to herself in every way she wants to be. She can be isolated, withdrawn, moody, and negative.

The Irregulars: Leopold [INFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Ne-Si-Te

Leopold has rejected everything about being a royal, because he doesn’t want to be one and it doesn’t suit his personality. He tells his manservant if he forces him to remain in the palace, he will simply stop seeing everyone, talking to everyone, and doing “price things.” He feels much more at home among the street kids, where no one knows him and they all treat him normally. When a princess tells him they ought to prepare themselves to marry each other, he frankly replies, “I’m going to do everything in my power to make sure that never happens.” He’s sensitive to what others say about him and wants the people he cares about most to like him, without concerning himself about whether anyone else likes him or not, and he’s not afraid to alienate himself from his mother if need be to live the way he wants to. He makes repeated attempts to run away from the palace, succeeding in most of them and jeopardizing his safety in the process. He has certain ideas about how the outside world is going to be, and is curious about all of it, but also somewhat bookish and intellectual. Leo uses what he knows from palace life to help Bea and her friends solve the clue of the Chinese puzzle box, link the murder attempts to the Duke of Wellington, etc. He seems to be seeking a place to call home that feels more home-like to him than the distant place where he does not belong. Leo, for a time, after Beau rejects him, resigns himself to the life he does not want, saying that his servant has “won,” but then returns to his friends when he becomes aware of their need for his help. He can be rude under stress.

Enneagram: 4w5 sx/so

Leo admits that he does not feel like he fits in anywhere, that he is too broken for anyone to love him, and that he always feels like an outsider who doesn’t belong, whether it’s in the palace or in the streets. He assumes people will not want him and that there is something wrong with him, and feels frustrated that his broken body (his tendency to easily get hurt) has made it impossible for him to have the life that he wants outside the palace gates – so eventually, he simply decides to take that life for himself by doing what he wants, regardless of his personal safety or how it might impact others. He has to be true to who he is, he has to be with the woman he loves (not someone his mother has chosen for him), and he needs to find people who accept him for who he is. It took him a long time to leave his comfort zone, and Leo is prone to depressive and melancholic episodes. He resists others’ attempts to flatter him, and doesn’t need their approval in his decisions.

The Shape of Water: Elisa Esposito [INFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Ne-Si-Te

Elisa feels an inexplicable pull toward the amphibian man, even though he has given her every indication of being violent toward people—even going so far as to bite off a man’s fingers on one of the first times she sees him. She somehow knows how to connect to him, by feeding him eggs, and to trust him, by devaluing how he treats others (and going off only her own insight into his nature). She decides fairly early on that he is worthy of person-hood and should be protected and saved, that he is as human as she is, and never wavers from this conclusion, even after he eats her neighbor’s cat. She likes to try on different ideas, often using her imagination to create scenarios in which she and he can live together happily—even fantasizing about dancing with him, in the style of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, over the dinner table. Elsa’s argument against his survival to her friend Giles is fundamentally self-referencing—she sees him as an extension of herself, a mirror image; if they call him a ‘thing’ because he cannot talk, and she cannot talk, what does that make her? And she believes if they do not save him, they are little better than the ‘monsters’ who captured him in the first place. She’s able to fall in love without words with a creature that can only communicate through sign language. When she finds out he’s going to be killed, Elisa decides immediately to get him out of the facility—and organizes her friends to help her. She uses what she has learned (about how to tilt up the cameras, and that there is a corridor she can use to get to the loading docks) to get him out quickly and efficiently. She can be quite forceful when she wants to be, and somewhat recklessly sign-language insults the man interrogating her out of contempt. Though she maintains a routine each day, and shows a particular fondness for old movies (something she shares with Giles), Elisa is somewhat forgetful of the details in the moment, such as when she forgets to click out her card after work on the day she intends to steal the amphibian man—one minor detail that could have revealed her as the ‘kidnapper’ (fortunately, her best friend takes care of it for her). She also somewhat foolishly fills the entire bathroom with water so they can swim and make love together, not realizing or thinking about where all that water will go – right down into the theater beneath their feet!

Enneagram: 4w5 sx/sp

Elise was born different. She cannot speak, and she has scars on her neck. These things alienate her from other people as she quietly goes about her business. It’s her shared sense of pain that draws her to the amphibian man at first, because he too is “broken.” He’s a freak of nature. He doesn’t look human, yet he has a soul. She identifies with his brokenness and wants to save him, because it joins them together. It bonds them in being too different to really fit into society. In its own way, they are beautiful in how different they are—from the world, from “normal” humans, and from people. She’s even deeply insulted when her friend doesn’t want to save him, since she assumes that’s a judgment call about her own sense of being human. I cannot speak, either… does that mean I am not human? Not worth saving? She makes these decisions from her heart, and is willing to face the potentially tragic consequences—to love and “lose” him when she has to set him free. She’s quiet (does not sign to people that much), withdrawn, and has very few friends. Often, she just observes rather than participates—until the creature she cares about is in danger, and then she springs into action.

Fate: The Winx Saga: Bloom [ISFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Se-Ni-Te

Bloom is preoccupied with who she is, where she came from, and wants to find her place in the world, through getting to the truth of her parentage. She feels at a loss without that knowledge, and impulsively follows the clues wherever they lead, out of a sense of it feeling right to her. At times, she can be selfish in failing to think through the consequences to the people around her, and in not rationally considering whether she is on the right track. She’s willing to drug the boy she cares about to spring a prisoner out of lockdown, free a woman of dubious intentions from an ancient prison, and then give her access to the woodland magic that controls the barrier. Tragically, this leads to Rosalind deceiving her and unleashing Burned Ones upon the school, endangering hundreds of innocent lives. It also leads to the murder of the headmistress, whom Bloom realizes too late was not lying to her to keep her from the truth, but to protect her from worse things. Her short-sighted decisions are opportunistic (such as when she allows Beatrix to take her to the mountains and showed her the charred remains of the village burned in the assault), but she often either overlooks the obvious questions (whether not she can trust people, or what the deeper meaning of this situation might be) or follows a ‘hunch’ that is only partly right; she knows Ms. Dowling is hiding the truth from her, but leaps to the wrong conclusions about her reasons, assigns evil motives to her where none exists, and trusts the wrong two people (Beatrix and Rosalind). By the end of the story, Bloom has admitted to her mistakes and made up with her friends, after destroying the Burned Ones to protect them all.

Enneagram: 4w5 sp/sx

Bloom can be quite uncharitable to people; in her argument with her mother, she says at least she isn’t a “basic bitch” unlike her mother. This embodies her entire attitude toward other people—I’m different and better than you are, and I don’t need you. She withdraws from her roommates for a long time. When in the human world, she often refuses to leave her room or go out with other kids, seeing no reason to be friends with them. Bloom, at her worst, will stubbornly do what is best for herself, at the cost of everyone else (she gets teachers and fellow students harmed in the process of freeing the wrong people). It takes her awhile to admit to her own self-absorption and tendency to shut people out. Her 5wing is also withdrawn, unsure of herself, afraid to practice magic with other students watching, and would rather sneak out of a party and go off alone than socialize.

Effie Gray: John Ruskin [INFP 4w5]

Function Order: Fi-Ne-Si-Te

“What is the purpose of art? To idealize? To sentimentalize? No, of course not. The purpose of art is to reveal the truth. The purpose of art is to reveal God.”

John Ruskin, Effie Gray

Immature INFPs prioritize their own feelings and needs above those of everyone around them, become increasingly self-absorbed in their pursuit of literary careers and lofty ideals, and make themselves oblivious to the pain of others. This, unfortunately, is the case with John Ruskin.

He makes no effort unless he cares about something, which means he spends all of his time delving into his myriad of different interests, hobbies, and tastes, ranging from poetry and music to painting and giving lectures on various topics, or writing in an effort to change the world, and neglecting his wife in the process. He has no consideration for her needs or feelings and no interest in her affairs, because she does not share his intellectual interests. Rather than go out and experience the world by her side to make her happy, John avoids all social contact and parties, preferring to stay shut up in his office and scribble away at his essays all day long. John is oblivious to her concerns and dismissive of her pain over her mother’s recent miscarriages because it does not interest him (he bluntly states that her mother has lost so many children, he cannot be bothered to keep count of them, and likens her to ‘farmyard breeding stock’). He blames Effie for her own unhappiness and nastily says it’s up to a wife to ‘entertain themselves, rather than wanting constant affirmation and attention.’ John has attained an ‘infant-like status,’ in that he has never become independent, never left home, and still relies heavily on his mother to provide for all of his needs, to such an extent that he keeps not even his private legal affairs from his parents.

Enneagram: 4w5 sp/so

When the critics of his friends’ artwork complain about how ugly it is, John argues that there is beauty in all life, even the hideous, and that it is an expression of deepest humanity and thus, shows the face of God just as much as a beautiful scene. He can be a tad pretentious and arrogant in his superior taste, and is admittedly completely self-absorbed. He’s often so caught up in his own feelings of disgust, revulsion for his wife’s body (and all sex), and his interests, that he has no time or consideration for how she is feeling, or the depth of her pain. He dismisses her depressive state as nonsense, a hysterical overreaction to a perfectly decent life. He is almost a recluse, a hermit who doesn’t want to go out and meet people (they give him headaches), who looks down on his wife for her need to socialize (parties, ugh), and who has no interest in experiencing anything of life, including sex. It is far more interesting to him in an abstract ideal than as a cold reality. Indeed, he fell in love with his wife in a fairy tale way, seeing her as an ‘ideal’ woman, rather than as a person.

The Secret Garden: Colin Craven [ISTJ 4w5]

Functional Order: Si-Te-Fi-Ne

Perceiving Functional Axis:

Introverted Sensing (Si) / Extroverted Intuition (Ne)

Colin takes everything at face value and needs Mary to show him that life could be different from the bedroom where he has spent his entire life. He simply trusts how it has always been and what he was always told, that he is dying and cannot walk. He is highly curious and loves to read and learn things, and references it when he talks with Mary about her dog (“I have a book about training dogs… fetch it for me!”). Reading his mother’s letters allows him to piece things together and see things in a new light. When Mary offers to tell him a new story she has made up rather than read him one out of one of his books, Colin makes a face and denies her request. He tells Mary that her intuitive perception of her mother not loving her was wrong, because the letters they found “say otherwise.” Many of his fears and apprehensions stem from past-precedent; his father has a hump, so he will have one too; his mother died young, so he will too.

Judging Functional Axis:

Extroverted Thinking (Te) / Introverted Feeling (Fi)

He seems to be in a Fi loop most of the time, but is also blunt, authoritative, and expects others to cater to his temper tantrums and every whim. Colin will sometimes simply state the facts of whatever is happening (“The dog… now he’s licking my hand!”). He trusts the facts in his books and often references them when discussing things (his knowledge of trees and plants and dogs; his desire to hear the names of the different varieties of flowers in the garden). When he loops into Fi, Colin is angry, demanding, self-centered, easily-insulted, and highly emotional. He has learned screaming and crying gets him what he wants from the staff, so he uses that to get people to do his bidding. He refuses to do anything he doesn’t want to do, including enter his mother’s wardrobe and see her garments, visit the place where she died and find the beauty in it, or hush up if he wants to scream. He issues orders and expects people to follow them, and has an inflated sense of his own tragic self-importance.

Enneagram: 4w5 sp/so

Colin is preoccupied with his own poor health, his crippled back, and is sure he is “going to die.” Tragically. He is often hysterical, over reactive, and temperamental, self-absorbed in his melodramatic feelings and insistent upon having others cater to his emotional needs. He doesn’t like the idea that Mary has suffered as much has he has, so he react angrily to her whenever she sneers at his melodrama. He is loud, screams, cries, and throws tantrums, locks people out of his room, and threatens to tell on them for their ‘bad’ behavior. Colin would rather mourn his mother forever than move past it or look for happy things himself. It takes his friends dragging him out to the garden and showing him its wonders to coax him into a happier place of potential joy at the prospect of “living.” He also suffers from a crippling amount of terror of the outside world. He has never left his room, he does not want to face any of his mother’s things, he doesn’t want to visit his mother’s bedroom, and he would rather hear about things from Mary than experience them himself. Colin becomes hysterical at being taken outside, since he’s terrified of dying or falling ill or feeling unsafe. He is fearful much of the time.

LOST: John Locke [INFJ 4w5]

Functional Order: Ni-Fe-Ti-Se

Perceiving Functional Axis:

Introverted Intuition (Ni) / Extroverted Sensing (Se)

John constantly speaks of “destiny,” and “fate,” and “spirit walks.” He forms an immediate mystical bond with the island and believes it can both teach him things, and show him things about himself and other people. The strange events of the island do not faze him; he takes them all in stride. He tends to fixate and visualize on something, and then not quit pursuing it until he gets what he wants (even on the mainland, he stubbornly clung to his idealistic belief of going on the nature walk / hike despite being in a wheelchair). He has trained himself to be aware of his environment and able to use it, through extensive research into hunting, tracking, and survival skills. Locke completely immerses himself in the experience of the island – when others run for cover, he enjoys the rain. He gets a kick out of dangerous situations and even sometimes puts himself in them for fun. Being out of a wheelchair has made him highly active and eager to pursue purely physical things.

Judging Functional Axis:

Extroverted Feeling (Fe) / Introverted Thinking (Ti)

He is interested not merely in his own self-growth, but that of others, and tries to guide them to self-awareness as much as he can (teaching Walt how to hunt or throw knives, taking Boone under his wing to educate him about the island). Locke shows an ability to understand other people’s needs and desires; his own emotions only rarely surface (anger over not being allowed to do things on the mainland) but he is attentive to other people’s feelings and needs and can even be manipulative with them in accomplishing what he wants. If the facts seem insurmountable, Locke thinks around them. He trusts that at some point, the solution will present itself. Rather than try to force open the hatch, he would rather meditate on it until a solution comes to him. He often takes direct action rather than announce his intentions or formulate plans. He tends to keep his schemes inside his own head, and at first has no real interest in leadership or controlling others, so much in figuring out what the island, its occupants, and its mysticism all mean to him, personally.

Enneagram: 4w5 so/sp

John arrived at the island ‘broken’ because of his father’s betrayal and the subsequent loss of his legs, and he finally feels like he has a ‘special’ connection to the island, which he exploits by using all the ‘expert’ skills he accumulated in preparation for his Australian Walkabout. In flashbacks, we see that he becomes angry at the other people in his support group, and insists they don’t know what suffering is, with the implication he does; his pain is worth more than theirs, his cuts are deeper, his losses more traumatic. His need to feel special drives him to cultivate anyone who admires him, such as Boothe, but his arrogance and total belief in his unique ability to understand the island can cause problems among the other survivors, such as when he urges Boothe to climb up into an airplane, only to get him killed. He becomes hysterical in his earlier life, whenever anyone tells him what he can or cannot do. He ruins his romantic relationship with his unwillingness to forgive his father—instead of doing what he agreed with his girlfriend he would (move on), he stalks his father’s house and sits endlessly at his gate to punish him for his actions. His 5 wing enjoys being an expert on things, and is somewhat detached from other people in many of his more ruthless or questionable decisions. He believes in whatever he decides is true, and can become quite petty when he is proven wrong (such as about the hatch).