Function Order: Se-Ti-Fe-Ni

Zeus was something of a bad-ass in his younger years, known for siring children without their mother’s permission (changing himself into their husband and seducing them) and not really caring about the aftermath (it got the woman killed and almost killed his offspring, Perseus). He enters the fray and fights even though it’s at great personal risk. He impulsively enables Hades to wreak havoc among the humans in exchange for them tearing down a statue of him, believing it will “turn them back to us.” Instead, it allows Hades to grow more powerful while Zeus’ authority shrinks. He never questions his brother until it’s too late, nor his own judgment, and instead, rationalizes his decisions as being for the greater good. Zeus initially created humanity so it could worship and love the gods, so their prayers would fuel the heavens… and his brother, Hades, accuses him of tempering his wrath too much with mercy, out of “love” for his creations. He cares about Perseus so much, he offers him a way out of the chaos and destruction he wreaks upon humanity (through his brother, since he cannot bear to do it himself) by joining him in Olympus. When Perseus refuses, Zeus enables him to succeed by giving him coins and tools to aid his journey, then resurrecting the woman he loves for him to wed, so he has a “companion through life.” Zeus is somewhat confused when humans go off the path he carved out for them, since he intended them for a specific cause –he believes in his brother’s humanity, even when Hades proves him wrong and tricks him on several occasions. He often doesn’t know what Hades is up to until it’s too late.

Enneagram: 3w2 so/sx

Zeus created humanity to serve a purpose and worship the gods, therefore expanding their power. He is rather unscrupulous in his tactics, cheating the system wherever it seems advantageous (disguising himself as various creatures and persons to sleep with women, and then going back to his life in the heavens). He’s somewhat arrogant, but also shows a lot of 2 wing influences. Zeus has “grown soft” in Hades’ eyes because he loves his little mortals too much to unleash hell on them for not obeying or worshipping him. But he also expects a return on his investment; he gave them life, he blesses them, and they reward him by tearing down the statues of the gods and no longer praying to them. In his absolute wrath, Zeus enables his brother to go among them, create chaos, and destruction… in the hope that it will make them repent. Instead, it makes them angrier and more defiant. He gifts Perseus with whatever he needs and makes several attempts to communicate with and build a relationship with his son. Even though he as a right to hate Hades for what he has done (imprisoning him and draining his power to release their tyrannical father), Zeus forgives him and welcomes him back into the fold.